Johanna Lasser had lived in a dozen apartments before she bought her first house two years ago, a rundown Victorian in Ditmas Park, Brooklyn. Lasser and her husband, Jimm, figured they would fix it up, stay a few years and then move on to a house in the suburbs, or one in a better school district, as many people do.

It didn’t take long for that plan to stop making sense.

“Once you’ve got all that work done, where would we go in the city except to another place that somebody had just fixed up?” said Lasser, 40, a stay-at-home mother who’s pregnant with her second child. “We’d just be switching apples for apples.”

Ms. and Mr. Lasser are not the only homeowners with doubts about moving these days. Americans have been moving less over the years, with only 11 percent changing households in 2017, down from 13 percent in 2007, according to United States census data. Historically, we stayed in our homes for around six years; now we’re now staying for 10, according to the National Association of Realtors.

The mood is affecting how we live in our homes and where we spend our money. More than three-quarters of the respondents to an October Zillow survey, for example, reported that, given the option, they’d rather spend a lump sum of money renovating their current home than on a down payment for a new one.

What happens, though, when the home you think is your starter house becomes your forever house?

Read more in The New York Times.