American farmers, already hit by low commodity prices and China’s punitive trade tariffs, are poised to endure further pain in 2019 now that a major Pacific trade deal has come into effect.

The Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Pacific Partnership, or CPTPP, was ratified by seven of its member countries on Sunday. Now that the massive free trade pact is a reality for Australia, Canada, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Singapore and Vietnam, the remaining four members — Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, and Peru — are soon expected to follow suit.

The milestone agreement, a refurbished version of the Trans-Pacific Partnership, will slash tariffs among the 11 nations that cover 14 percent of global growth, making their exports cheaper in each other’s markets. Around 90 percent of planned tariff cuts will immediately take place, HSBC said in a note on Sunday, adding that businesses will benefit from reduced administrative costs thanks to other benefits such as pre-arrival customs clearance.

The goods of non-CPTPP members such as the United States are now expected to be pricier and less competitive in the 11 CPTPP countries.

The world’s largest economy was initially one of the countries negotiating the wide-ranging deal under former U.S. President Barack Obama but the U.S. withdraw under President Donald Trump’s administration in early 2017. American meat and agricultural products are particularly expected to suffer in CPTPP nations that don’t have free trade arrangements with Washington.

Read more in CNBC.