Events

Analyzing business financial statements and tax returns starts with understanding the basic components of the balance sheet and income statement, along with the reconciliation of retained earnings, plus footnotes and other disclosures. The business tax return is nothing more than a financial statement with similar components, but with a different format and structure. A second step is to use a diagram, with the components in rough proportion to dollar size, to see how the components “flow” together and interact to create three major financial relationships: (1) Sales to total assets, (2) profit retention, and (3) leverage. A third step is to identify and understand the key principles underlying the three primary methods of accounting, followed by examining an accountant cover letter, if applicable.

Covered Topics

Identify various financial statement analysis options and tools, plus the basic structure and purposes of financial statements and tax returns
Diagram the statement components and how they flow together and create three major relationships
Identify various levels of accountant-prepared financial statements (compilations, reviews and audits) and related accountant cover letters
Describe key issues in using internal or company-prepared statements, as well as interim statements
Compare and contrast the three primary methods of accounting
Key standards, limitations and alternatives within accrual accounting or generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP)

Target Audience
Credit analysts, portfolio managers, assistant relationship managers, community bankers, small business lenders, commercial lenders, consumer lenders, branch managers that lend to business owners, private bankers, special assets

Presenter
Richard Hamm, Advantage Consulting & Training

Registration Option
Live presentation $275

Recording available through Feb. 23, 2022

This seminar will provide the banker with several advanced tax return concepts and related analyses to help them more effectively work with their business customers.

The session will begin with a brief review of analyzing a business owner’s personal 1040 tax return and the return of an LLC, S corporation, and C corporation including Schedules M-1 and M-2, Schedule K-1, pass-through transactions, and other deductions.

The remainder of the seminar will cover the following advanced tax topics related to business clients:

Corporate tax Issues including business structure, Section 179 depreciation, and bonus depreciation
Investments including capital gain/loss issues and passive activities
Real estate issues including personal residence, rentals, home offices, and 1031 tax-free exchanges
Employer provided benefits including Qualified Retirement Plans and Health Savings Accounts (HSAs)
Retirement planning strategies including defined benefit plans and captive insurance
Estate planning issues including gifting
Year-end tax strategies
Changes to the tax code that impact business owners including the tax cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA)
Each of the program topics will be presented from the perspective of more effectively working with the bank’s business customers.

Target Audience
Commercial lenders, credit analysts, loan documentation specialists, branch managers, private bankers, and business development officers

Presenter
David Osburn, Osburn & Associates, LLC

Registration Option
Live presentation $275

Recording available through Feb. 15, 2022

This program will explore multiple models of both business and personal (business owner) cash flow analyses.

The session will begin with the business traditional EBITDA cash flow and personal cash flow of the business owner (using the 1040 tax return, including tax schedules and K-1s, and the personal financial statement). Additionally, the Global Cash Flow or combined business & personal cash flow model will be displayed.

This will be followed by the Statement of Cash Flows (using the Direct and Indirect Methods), as prepared by the CPA, the UCA Cash Flow (using the Moody’s software spreadsheet), Cash Basis Cash Flow, Fixed-Charge Coverage (FCC), and Free Cash Flow (FCF).

Various cash flow projections and sensitivity analyses will also be explored.

The webinar will then conclude with commercial real estate (CRE) cash flow analysis and other related real estate investment cash flow models.

Covered Topics

Business (EBITDA) & personal cash flow analyses
Global cash flow: combining the business and personal cash flows
Statement of cash flows, UCA cash flow, cash basis cash flow, fixed-charge coverage, and free cash flow
Cash flow projections and sensitivity analysis
CRE cash flow analysis including investment models

Target Audience
Commercial lenders, commercial relationship managers, credit analysts, loan administrators

Presenter
David Osburn, Osburn & Associates, LLC

Registration Option
Live presentation $275

Recording available through Feb. 9, 2022

Attend this proactive seminar and learn a comprehensive approach to financial statement analysis.

The session will begin with analyzing the four financial statements – Income Statement, Statement of Retained Earnings, Balance Sheet, and Statement of Cash Flows. This will include revenue and expense recognition, FIFO, LIFO, and average inventory costing models, operating expenses (repairs) versus improvements, depreciation including straight-line, units-of-production, and double-declining balance, amortization, and depletion.

The seminar will also explore accounts receivable assessment, allowance for doubtful accounts, intangible assets, accounts payable assessment, capital and operating leases, and analysis of the equity section of the Balance Sheet including partners’ capital accounts, common and preferred stock, treasury stock, stock splits, and retained earnings.

Additionally, the types or levels of financial statements will be highlighted including company-prepared, compiled, reviewed, and audit. The audited financial statements will include unqualified, qualified, adverse, and disclaimer.

The participant will then be introduced to a five-part financial statement analysis model which will include the liquidity, activity, leverage, operating performance, and cash flow.

The Cash Flow section will include the business traditional EBITDA cash flow and personal cash flow of the business owner (using the 1040 tax return, including tax schedules and K-1s, and the personal financial statement). Additionally, the global cash flow or combined business & personal cash flow model will be displayed along with sensitivity cash flow analysis.

Additionally, the related topics of the Z-Score (bankruptcy predictor) and the sustainable growth models will be reviewed.

Two case studies will be used to illustrate the five-part analysis model and the correct interpretation of the financial statements.

Objectives:

Analyze the four financial statements including Income Statement, Statement of Retained Earnings, Balance Sheet, and Statement of Cash Flows
Explore income statement issues including revenue recognition, inventory costing, and depreciation
Cover Balance Sheet accounts including accounts receivable, allowance for doubtful accounts, accounts payable, and the equity section
Review the levels of financial statement reporting including company-prepared, compiled, reviewed, and audit
Analyze a “five-part” analysis model including liquidity, activity, leverage, operating performance, and cash flow
Analyze the EBITDA, personal (business owner), global, and sensitivity cash flow analyses
Discuss the Z-score (bankruptcy predictor) and sustainable growths models
Summarize the seminar concepts through case studies

Target Audience
Commercial lenders, commercial relationship managers, credit analysts, loan administrators

Presenter
David Osburn, Osburn & Associates, LLC

Registration Option
Live presentation $275

Recording available through Feb. 2, 2022

Many bankers underwrite loans primarily from personal and business tax returns, particularly at the community bank level. What reported income is actually cash flow? How can we properly assess a large capital gain (or loss)? How can you determine of an item is recurring? Why should you exclude non-recurring items? How do loss carryforwards affect cash flow? What is the Section 179 deduction? This program provides answers and provides case examples.

Covered Topics

Examples of capital gains (and losses) and how to extract the cash flow involved
Issues in determining if an item is recurring
When to ask questions of the borrower and/or his or her tax advisor when the tax return does not appear to make sense
What is a loss carryforward item and how it should be treated in an analysis
Overview of Section 179 for write-off or depreciation of assets
In complex situations, ideas for limiting the analysis to material or significant items, and how to determine if further and/or annually updated information should be waived
Ways to move forward with analysis while waiting for additional information
Why you will often need information beyond what is reported in tax returns

Target Audience
Branch managers, consumer lenders, mortgage bankers, private bankers, small business lenders, commercial lenders, credit analysts, loan review specialists, special assets officers, lending managers and credit officers

Presenter
Richard Hamm, Advantage Consulting & Training

Registration Option

Live presentation $275

Recording available through Jan. 26, 2022

An important part of the commercial real estate (CRE) lending process is to establish the value of the collateral, and in many cases, the value does not need to come from a new appraisal. This program reviews these options that have been in place since the initial set of interagency appraisal guidelines in 1994. These options typically involve work internally by bankers. At the other end of the spectrum, some projects are very risky or the dollar amount warrants a review of the valuation by third-party appraiser. How does that work and what can bankers learn from the review appraiser’s approach?

Covered Topics

General situations where an appraisal is not required (exemptions)
Options for determining value when the loan is exempt from requiring a new appraisal
Situations where portfolio or market conditions might warrant a new appraisal, even in an exempt situation
Regulatory requirements for internal evaluations and a sample form
Key components in validating an existing appraisal and a sample form
Two situations that make a validation a difficult option
Types or levels of reviews: Administrative/compliance, technical, and third party
Practical suggestions for setting loan-size limits to trigger the levels of review
Sample comments from a review by a third-party appraiser, and how these observations often differ from typical banker review points – what can bankers learn from the third-party approach?
Practical issues with finding appraisers to do reviews and/or appraisal management companies (AMCs)
What is Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP) Standards Rule 3?
Review outcomes, and ideas on when and how to request revisions or corrections to the report

Target Audience
CRE lenders, commercial lenders, mortgage bankers, private bankers, small business lenders, credit analysts, loan review specialists, special assets officers, lending managers and credit officers

Presenter
Richard Hamm, Advantage Consulting & Training

Registration Option

Live presentation $275

Recording available through Jan. 26, 2022

Environmental due diligence is an important risk management tool in the underwriting and closing of commercial real estate loans. This webinar will cover the environmental aspects of the OCC’s risk management guidelines for commercial real estate lending as well as their practical implications for your bank.

Covered Topics
Key terminology
The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the local, state and federal power to regulate and enforce
Bank and customer site inspection questionnaires
Government records
Environmental Site Assessments (Phase I, II and III)
Transaction screening
Other appropriate inquiries
Interacting with Environmental Professionals
Impact of environmental contamination on values and borrower cash flow
Bank exposure as a lienholder on contaminated property
Key components of effective environmental risk management programs

Who Should Attend?
Commercial real estate lenders and credit officers, commercial lenders, credit analysts, loan review specialists, special assets officers, lending managers and support personnel, compliance officers and auditors.

Presenter
Robin Russell has practiced law for 30 years and is licensed in Texas, New York and Massachusetts. She is a fellow in the American College of Bankruptcy and of the American Law Institute. She combines a depth of experience in bankruptcy restructuring and litigation with financial transactions. She has represented corporate debtors, independent directors, liquidating trustees, bondholders, unsecured creditors’ committees, bank groups, private equity funds, landlords, trade creditors and bidders for estate assets in Chapter 11 and Chapter 7 bankruptcy proceedings. She has also represented banks, institutional lenders and corporate borrowers in commercial loan transactions and debt restructurings.

Robin is the principal author of Thomson Reuters’ Texas Practice Guides for both Creditors’ Rights and Financial Transactions and the Texas Bankers Association’s Texas Secured Lending Guide, Texas Problem Loan Guide, Texas Real Estate Lending Guide and Texas Account Documentation Guide. She is a frequent speaker on banking, bankruptcy and financial restructuring related topics and has served as a Chapter 7 Trustee. Robin received her LL.M. in Banking Law from Boston University and her J.D. from Baylor University where she was Editor-in-Chief of the Baylor Law Review and the highest ranking graduate in her class. She clerked for the Texas Supreme Court before beginning her legal career.

Registration Options
“Live” Web connection – $265
6-month “OnDemand” website link only – $295
CD-ROM and e-materials only – $345
Live plus OnDemand website link – $365
Premier Package: Live, OnDemand link, and CD-ROM plus – $395

Excel expert David Ringstrom, CPA, shares a variety of tricks and techniques you can use to create and automate Excel charts in this informative session. He covers several helpful features Excel offers, including the Recommended Charts feature, the Sparkline feature, and the PivotChart feature. In addition, David shows you step-by-step how to avoid repetitive formatting, create self-updating chart titles, summarize data based on a single criterion, and liven up your charts with clip art.

David demonstrates every technique at least twice: first, on a PowerPoint slide with numbered steps, and second, in the subscription-based Microsoft 365 (formerly Office 365) version of Excel. David draws your attention to any differences in the older versions of Excel (2019, 2016, 2013, and earlier) during the presentation as well as in his detailed handouts. David also provides an Excel workbook that includes most of the examples he uses during the webcast.

Microsoft 365 is a subscription-based product that provides new feature updates as often as monthly. Conversely, the perpetual licensed versions of Excel have feature sets that don’t change. Perpetual licensed versions have year numbers, such as Excel 2019, Excel 2016, and so on.

Covered Topics
Adding/removing chart features rapidly by way of the improved chart interface in Excel 2013 and later.
Applying a consistent look and feel to your charts by way of chart templates.
Building a basic chart within an Excel worksheet.
Building a Thermometer chart for use in fund drives and other goals as a means of exploring lesser-known chart options.
Converting a chart to a static picture for archival purposes or for use in other applications.
Creating pivot charts from lists of data in Excel.
Creating rolling charts that automatically display data for the last five years, six months, or whatever time frame you choose.
Displaying data on two different axes with Combo charts in Excel 2013 and later.
Duplicating the formatting of one chart into a second chart.
Eliminating the need to manually resize charts when data is added—automate this with tables instead.
Enlivening charts with clip art.
Illustrating financial statements with the Waterfall chart in Excel 2016 and later.

Who Should Attend?
Practitioners who can benefit by creating and automating Excel charts.

Presenter
David H. Ringstrom, CPA, is an author and nationally recognized instructor who teaches scores of webinars each year. His Excel courses are based on over 25 years of consulting and teaching experience. David’s mantra is “Either you work Excel, or it works you,” so he focuses on what he sees users don’t, but should, know about Microsoft Excel. His goal is to empower you to use Excel more effectively. To learn more about David, you can view his LinkedIn profile and follow him on Facebook or Twitter (@excelwriter).

Registration Options
“Live” Web connection – $265
6-month “OnDemand” website link only – $295
CD-ROM and e-materials only – $345
Live plus OnDemand website link – $365
Premier Package: Live, OnDemand link, and CD-ROM plus – $395

This is a two-part series to be held on October 26th and 28th. The prices below include all sessions. Each session can also be attended individually by clicking on the links below.

Covered Topics
Opening Complex New Accounts Part I: Business Accounts
Opening business accounts can create angst! Sole Proprietorships owned by a married couple, LLCs owned by other entities, LLPs, General Partnerships, Limited Partnerships, and Corporations all can be quite complicated! Why are there so many different types of business entities? What is the securest way to determine who has the authority to transact on behalf of a business entity – especially when owed by another entity? Verifying if a business entity is legitimate and who has the authority to transact on behalf of an entity can be challenging. When can a business owner use an SSN vs. an EIN? When does a bank need a partnership agreement, bylaws, or operating agreement? How does FinCen fit into the picture? In this three-hour comprehensive webinar, participants gain confidence and a clear understanding of the regulatory, compliance, documentation, and proper TIN requirements for opening complex business accounts. This session, although thorough and robust, is not state law specific.

Opening Complex New Accounts Part II: Trust and Fiduciary
Fiduciary accounts are complicated! Formal Revocable and Irrevocable Trusts, Living Trusts, POD, UTMA, POA, Court Ordered, Guardianship, Conservatorship, Rep Payee, and VA accounts represent a Fiduciary relationship and an element of risk if not handled properly. It never fails to raise the panic level when someone dumps a binder full of legal documents on your desk and requests to open a “Fiduciary” account. To compound the complexity, on many occasions, the actual owner of the funds is not present. This three-hour comprehensive webinar, which is Part II of a two-part series, will thoroughly discuss the responsibilities of collecting appropriate documentation, titling accounts correctly, and allowing proper access to Fiduciary accounts not only during life but also at the death of a Fiduciary.

It is highly recommended you have a copy of your financial institution’s account agreement and signature card to use as a reference during the sessions.

Who Should Attend?
Customer contact personnel, supervisors and officers whose responsibilities include opening or managing new accounts. Personal Bankers, BSA Officers, Deposit Operations, Branch Administration, CIP Managers, Training and Business Development Officers, Internal Auditors and Compliance Officers will find the information beneficial. Lending assistants and officers will find the information informative as well.

Presenter
Suzie Jones relates to her audience. For decades, Suzie opened new accounts, managed new account teams, and provided hands-on input to the AML and BSA Committees within the bank. With over 45 years of banking and 35 years of financial planning experience, Suzie has a reputation as a highly knowledgeable and high-energy speaker with a unique ability to take technical information and make it interesting and applicable. Her real-life examples provide context and depth to complex regulations and documentation requirements.

After 22 years, Suzie recently retired as an Executive Vice President from a $65B regional bank, where she provided overall leadership and risk management to the $11B Investments Division. She partners nationally to provide new account training for individual banks, credit unions, private organizations, and 14 state banking associations.

Registration Options

“Live” Web connection – $485
6-month “OnDemand” website link only – $535
CD-ROM and e-materials only – $625
Live plus OnDemand website link – $665
Premier Package: Live, OnDemand link, and CD-ROM plus – $715

Basic “business” structure will be presented along with loan “structure” and loan “support.” Additionally, “commercial” lending issues relative to loan documentation will be reviewed. “Loan pricing” and “monitoring” will also be covered along with a review of current compliance issues.

The webinar will be summarized through a comprehensive case study.

Covered Topics
Review Basic “business” Structure: C Corporations to LLC’s
Explore the Six (6) Elements of Loan Structure: Loan Purpose, Sources of Repayment, Adequate Amount, Appropriate Term, Adequate Support, Framework for Monitoring
Summarize the Four (4) Elements of Loan Support: Collateral, Guaranties, Business Loan Agreements, Subordination Agreements
Highlight “commercial” Loan Documentation issues including promissory notes, security agreements, and guaranties along with the use of the BSA Loan Rating,
Discuss Loan Pricing and Monitoring Issues
Review current compliance issues: Equal Credit Opportunity Act (Reg B), Bank Secrecy Act (BSA), Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, and UCC Article 9
Analyze comprehensive Loan Structure/Documentation/Compliance Case Study

Who Should Attend?
Commercial lenders, credit analysts, loan documentation specialists, branch managers, assistant branch managers, private bankers, and business development officers.

Presenter

David L. Osburn, MBA, CCRA, is the founder of Osburn & Associates, LLC, a Business Training & Contract CFO Firm that provides seminars, webinars, and keynote speeches for bankers, CPAs, credit managers, attorneys, and business owners.

His extensive professional background of over 30 years includes 21 years as a Business Trainer/ Contract CFO and 16 years as a bank commercial lender including the position of Vice President/Senior Banking Officer. Mr. Osburn has also been an adjunct college professor for over 30 years including College of Southern Nevada.

Registration Options

Live Access, 30 Days OnDemand Playback, Presenter Materials and Handouts $279

Available Upgrades:
12 Months OnDemand Playback + $110
12 Months OnDemand Playback + CD + $140
Additional Live Access + $75 per person