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This year, the Wisconsin Bankers Association will offer the 2022 Bank Directors Summit in two locations: Stevens Point on May 18 and Madison on May 19. The event draws beginning and experienced inside and outside directors, bank CEOs, bank executive officers, and bank general counsel. This year’s Summit will take a look at the nuts and bolts that are essential to the role of bank directors, while preparing leaders for the kinds of unique opportunities and challenges that could potentially lie ahead of them in 2022.

One of the key topics addressed at the Summit will be directors’ responsibilities in the investment portfolio. Speaking on the topic will be Ricky Brillard, senior vice president in the Investment Strategies Group at Vining Sparks Associates. Brillard is a Certified Public Accountant who works with financial institutions on balance sheet strategies, the optimization of investment portfolio returns, and the evaluation of asset/liability exposure, while incorporating the entity’s liquidity needs, risk controls, and capital constraints.

A presentation titled ‘2022 — A Year of What Ifs’ will be given by Marc Gall, vice president and asset/liability strategist at BOK Financial. As bankers have come to expect uncertainty over the last two years, Gall will walk Summit attendees through various scenarios to help prepare for the coming months and into the future. Gall is a returning speaker to the WBA Directors Summit, and his areas of expertise include asset/liability modeling, interpreting output and communicating strategies to key management and boards of directors, understanding and complying with regulatory requirements, and fixed income portfolio management/trade execution.

Other sessions to look forward to include ‘Unlock and Inspire a Team That Spans Four Generations’ by Flynt Gallagher of Newcleus Compensation Advisors as well as ‘A Director’s Role in Today’s Changing Banking Environment.’ To learn more and to register for the Stevens Point or Madison event, please visit www.wisbank.com/directors.

This year’s event centers around the theme “Rise”

The Wisconsin Banker’s Association is thrilled to announce that the annual Bank Executives Conference will be back in person February 9–11, 2022 at the Kalahari Convention Center in Wisconsin Dells. This is the premiere event for bank leaders in the state. The theme of this year’s event will be “Rise.” Wisconsin bankers have risen to the occasion over the course of the pandemic, and this conference will address what it will take to be resilient and relevant in 2022.

Networking

Being back in person opens the door for the kind of networking opportunities that bank leaders have been craving for nearly two years. The conference will kick off with a networking reception on Wednesday evening, but bankers are invited and encouraged to arrive earlier for optional afternoon “banker-only” peer group discussions starting at 2:30 p.m. Peer group discussions are geared toward the roles of CEOs, CFOs, credit and lending, operations, and organizational development. Opportunities to connect with fellow bankers, WBA Associate Members, and WBA staff will be plentiful throughout the conference, with an exhibitor Marketplace providing a dedicated space for making connections.

Executive-Level Education

The WBA Bank Executives Conference brings national experts to Wisconsin, while providing tailored programming specific to the needs of banking leaders in our state. Among the trending topics that will be covered at the conference are:

  • Changes that emerged during the pandemic that are now here to stay
  • Talent recruitment and retention
  • Technology, fintech, and digital transformation
  • Cryptocurrency
  • And more!

New Hybrid Option for 2022 A livestream will allow attendees at the bank to view the keynote sessions on February 10 and 11.

The opening keynote session is titled, “Business as Unusual: How to Future-Proof Your Business in Transformational Times.” In this engaging, provocative, and insightful keynote session, acclaimed global futurist and best-selling author Jack Uldrich will not only discuss how the Coronavirus is transforming the world of tomorrow, he will explain why it is accelerating many of the trends that were already at work prior to the epidemic. History reminds us that great crises produce great change — as well as great opportunities. To take advantage of these extraordinary opportunities, businesses must position themselves now to operate in a world where “business as unusual” is the new “usual.” This session will help leaders at every level of an organization leverage ten “unconventional” techniques to succeed in today’s — and tomorrow’s — transformational times.

Dr. Chris Kuehl, managing director of Armada Corporate Intelligence, will present a keynote session, “2022 – The Real Recovery Year?” That honor was supposed to go to 2021, but we all know what happened over the last several months — inflation, labor shortage, supply chain breakdowns, and the repeated resurgence of the virus. Now we have these lingering issues along with the reactions — higher interest rates, efforts to restore, continued engagement by the government. The bankers have been placed squarely in the middle of all this and expected to do most of the heavy lifting. Does that continue and what can we really expect as far as growth and recovery?

For more details on programming and to view the full agenda, please visit www.wisbank.com/bec.

Banking leaders are eager to rise to the challenges ahead of them, and the conference will provide actionable tools and knowledge attendees can bring back to their banks and communities.

Recognition

The 2021 Banker of the Year will be announced at the conference, recognizing a bank CEO or president (or an individual who has recently retired from these positions) who has made an outstanding effort throughout their career in service to their bank, to their community, and to the banking profession.

The Wisconsin Bankers Foundation Financial Education Innovation Award will be presented at a special luncheon on February 10. This prestigious award recognizes a bank’s unique efforts to enhance the financial capability of consumers in their community, whether it’s a new kind of educational game for students, curriculum developed for adult seminars, or some other new or innovative approach to financial education.

The 50- and 60-Year Clubs recognize bankers who have served in the banking industry for 50 and 60 years, respectively. These awards will be presented during the special luncheon at the conference to honor professionals who have dedicated their careers to the banking industry.

Entertainment

Ope! Charlie Berens, best known to Wisconsinites for his viral video series, “The Manitowoc Minute,” will perform at the Chairman’s Dinner Program on Thursday, February 10.

Comedian, Emmy award-winning journalist, and Wisconsin native Charlie Berens — who rose to fame from his video series, “The Manitowoc Minute” — will provide the entertainment for the Chairman’s Dinner Program on February 10. Attendees can expect lots of laughs from the author of the recently released book, “The Midwest Survival Guide: How We Talk, Love, Work, Drink, and Eat. . . Everything With Ranch.” Berens has been featured on Fox, CBS, Funny or Die, TBS Digital, Variety, MTV News, and more. In 2013, he won an Emmy for “The Cost of Water” while reporting for Texas news station KDAF. “The Manitowoc Minute” series has garnered millions of views and paved the way for a sold-out standup comedy tour. Geez, Louise, this is sure to be a hilarious show you won’t want to miss!

Register

To register for the conference, please visit www.wisbank.com/bec. We look forward to seeing you Wednesday, February 9–Friday, February 11 at the Kalahari Convention Center in Wisconsin Dells!

Joe Fazio was looking for an organization that connects companies with potential board of director candidates a year ago when he learned about the Private Directors Association. He noticed the association had chapters in a variety of places around the U.S., but not in Wisconsin. So he asked why. 

“They said nobody has volunteered to do that yet,” said Fazio, who is chairman and chief executive officer of West Bend-based Commerce State Bank. 

Next thing he knew, Fazio was president of the Wisconsin Chapter, which launched in June of 2020 and has been growing ever since. In its first year it has attracted 159 members and six sponsors. So far, two banks doing business in Wisconsin are sponsors of the state chapter of PDA – Old National Bank and Town Bank. Inge Plautz, of Old National, is the vice president of the state chapter. 

“It’s gone really well, and there’s a significant interest in it,” Fazio said. 

Chicago-based PDA, founded in 2014 with 20 people, now has about 2,000 members nationwide and 18 chapters. Fazio called it the “go-to source” for private directors and boards. 

In addition to helping to connect diverse director candidates with companies seeking them, PDA offers educational resources for companies with boards. It also holds social gatherings, which, during the pandemic, have been mostly online. 

For example, this month (May) the Wisconsin chapter is hosting a  virtual wine tasting event featuring products from the Grgich Hills Estate Winery of Napa Valley, Calif. 

There are a couple of reasons PDA should appeal to banks, Fazio said. 

“We’re all required to have boards. So how do you get outside your circle of influence, and particularly, when you try to diversify your board,” Fazio said. “How do I go find that person?” 

Most bank boards in Wisconsin consist mainly of white males, he said. PDA can help introduce females and people of color who are fully qualified to serve on bank boards. 

“There are very talented diverse candidates who are very capable of being on boards of directors,” Fazio said. “And it drives me nuts when people say, ‘Yeah, I just can’t find a good diverse candidate.’” 

A second reason PDA could help banks is because banks serve businesses, he said. PDA could link a bank’s business customers with director candidates. 

“We want businesses to do well. So do they have a board, or do they need to set up a board?” Fazio said. “Particularly, like ESOP companies, they have to have a board of directors. So again, where do we find good directors?’” 

PDA resources also help potential directors prepare for the position and to stand out among candidates. 

“For instance, there is training on how to write to resume for a board seat, because it’s different from a traditional resume. Or how to interview for a board position. It’s different from a traditional interview. So that’s really valuable,” Fazio said. 

He said there are two main elements to PDA. 

“It’s really board education, and helping build a board, start a board, make it more efficient and effective,” Fazio said. “And then the other is to help the individual become more competitive and then connect those dots for those opportunities.” 

Fazio said he expects the Wisconsin chapter of PDA to have six to nine events each year. 

“Some will be webinars, and some in person,” he said. 

The cost to join is $350 a year.  

“As a member of the Wisconsin chapter, you really have access to all the events, all the people, all the expertise throughout the country in all the chapters,” Fazio said. 

A full list of PDA’s services can be found on its website

Paul Gores is a journalist who covered business news for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel for 20 years. Have a story idea? Contact him at paul.gores57@gmail.com.

By, Alex Paniagua

The banking industry is undergoing a prolonged period of tremendous change. In fact, many experts say that constant change is the new normal. As the guiding hand and governing body, bank boards must also adapt and adjust their focus in order to lead their institutions to success in today's volatile environment, all without losing sight of their primary responsibilities. Read on for a look at how directors and boards have changed in recent years, and for perspective on what your bank's board may need to transform into in the near future. 

Who's Sitting Around the Table?

Twenty or 30 years ago, the banking industry was much more straightforward than it is today, and was reasonably stable as well. That placed fewer demands on directors, in general. "As long as the board members were representative of the bank's market and were helpful in generating new business and making lending decisions they contributed to the success of the bank," said Cass Bettinger, president, Cass Bettinger and Associates. Often chosen for their community status or ongoing business with the bank, directors on historical bank boards often mirrored the bank's product mix, which facilitated their role as brand ambassadors, according to Julia Johnson, senior manager, Wipfli LLP. "However, those historical boards may not have had a thorough understanding of banking, and how banks serve as an intermediary of cash," she explained. "They put a lot of faith, confidence and trust in senior management to prudently manage the bank and ensure regulatory compliance." 

Walk into a bank boardroom in 1985 and you'd find a collection of businessmen, lawyers, accountants and community leaders, individuals with backgrounds in either business or finance. New directors were often selected based on their commercial relationship with the bank, their connections to the local business community, or because they (or their family) owned a large share of the bank's stock. According to Philip K. Smith, president, Gerrish McCreary Smith Consultants and Attorneys, the director role used to be viewed as a passive one with little impact on the overall success of the institution. "Historically the makeup of the board of a successful bank was identical to the makeup of the boards of unsuccessful banks," he said. "The focus of those kinds of boards was loan approval, dividend payments and general oversight." 

Walk into that same boardroom today, and you'll still find a collection of businessmen, lawyers, accountants and community leaders, but they may look very different. As with historical boards, today's directors are individuals with business acumen, and may also be representatives of large shareholders. "A good business background is helpful, and those people often end up leading discussions and have significant input," said John Knight, partner, Boardman & Clark llp. However, today's economic and regulatory environment has forced a move toward selecting directors to fill in gaps in expertise on the board, rather than business community or shareholder representation. "That has promoted much more diversity in the board in terms of gender, race, age and ethnicity," explained Smith. "Those go out the window when the question is 'what does the bank need?' rather than 'who should sit on the board?'." According to Knight, the composition of bank boards is transitioning slowly, especially at community banks. "It's quite different between community banks and regional or national banks," he said. "If I see a change, it's modest and gradual. This is not abrupt." Still, Johnson says not only is increased diversity necessary to bring in expertise, but it will also have an overall positive impact on the institution. "When you look at what needs to shift in terms of the composition of the board, we need to have more diversity on the board," she said. "While backgrounds may remain consistent, the diversity of individual experiences and perspectives contribute to the strength of the board by creating a rich and robust platform for discussion. Specifically, there will be greater representation of women and individuals of different ages on the board." 

Same Board, Shifted Focus

While the individuals sitting around the table and their backgrounds are not much different, the expectations placed on them and their approach to their role has shifted dramatically. "Traditionally, the board has looked to the CEO to be the primary strategist for the organization and that their role was simply to look at the strategic plan and approve it," Bettinger explained. "The biggest single change in responsibilities for board directors is that they now must be responsible for being actively engaged in the strategic planning process and understanding what it means." According to Knight, the law regarding directors' responsibilities has not changed appreciably, but the application of it has broadened as expectations from regulators rise. "In general terms, their fiduciary duties haven't really changed," he said. "But the regulators in particular expect more of directors." Those expectations mean directors can no longer be passive sources of commercial loan contacts. "In the past, directors could serve in a more passive capacity," Johnson said. "Today, the regulatory environment doesn't allow for that." 

Just as regulatory expectations for bank directors have transformed their role, so have market and economic influences. "Banks now have to be constantly reassessing their business model and changing it," said Bettinger. "The bank needs directors who have certain skillsets that will help the bank succeed in a changing marketplace." The ideal combination of skillsets will vary by institution, depending on the bank's strategic goals. "The board needs to know who the bank is and who they want to be in the future," Smith explained. "You identify new members by understanding the kind of bank you're trying to become and then reaching out to those people." For example, if the strategic plan forecasts growth through M&A activity, the board should have at least a couple directors with experience in that arena. That's why Johnson advocates not filling the board to capacity at all times. "I like to see banks that don't keep their board at full capacity, but leave a couple seats vacant as permitted by the bank's bylaws," she said. "This gives the bank flexibility to bring in new board members who have a particular expertise and/or enables the bank to create an overlap between a new director and an experienced director who may be stepping off the board." That provides the board with crucial responsiveness if a critical unmet need is identified.

With this shift away from more ceremonial boards to knowledge-based, strategic, active boards, the recruitment and training of board members is transforming as well. "It's a requirement that the board not micromanage but be much more active than historical boards," said Smith. "That changes the dynamic, even as you're recruiting people." Smith says the board must also take an active role in its own succession planning. "Directors must help recruit new board members," he said. "The board should consider itself a body independent of management and therefore participate in recruitment." The process for identifying potential successors should be familiar to the board, because it's the same one they use within the bank. "Look at the strategic plan and then do a board composition analysis, on the basis of knowledge, skills and abilities, and identify where you have gaps," said Johnson. "It's the same thing you do at the bank level. The key is to be intentional and proactive." Active recruitment also requires directors to understand and articulate why serving on the board is valuable. "In today's world, if you want somebody who's really good to come on your board, you need to have a winning value proposition for them," Bettinger explained. "You want them to feel that going on your board will be a great thing for them to do for the community and their business." 

Training: Not Just for New Directors
Offering regular education and training opportunities is one of the best ways bank executives can equip their directors (and therefore their bank) for success. After all, most directors will not have built-in understanding of the banking industry, and that is an important component of their fiduciary duty. Board education and training is a highly diverse process that varies greatly from board to board. The key is that it should not be a one-and-done onboarding session. "All board members of all banks ought to have some type of minimum requirement for continuing education every year," Smith advised. Bettinger recommends specifying the education and development each individual director needs and incorporating it into a written plan. This not only provides specific training for each board member, it's more efficient, too. "You don't want to spend money to send your entire board off to training that only a quarter of them need," Bettinger explained. "It's much more cost-effective to be individualized in your director education by identifying what specific education that each director needs that's most important." Another approach, specific to the onboarding process, is to provide one-to-one guidance. "You might even assign a mentor for a period of time," Johnson suggested. "Partner a new director with a seasoned director who can respond to questions."

Looking Forward

So, what will you see walking into a bank boardroom in 2030? "I'm already seeing more independent directors with specific expertise and experience that are relevant to the development and execution of strategy," said Bettinger. "A prime example is the crucial role that digital technologies increasingly play in developing, promoting and reinforcing winning customer value propositions; measuring and managing relationship profitability and loyalty; efficiency enhancement; and more effectively managing all categories of risk." With signs indicating that mergers and acquisitions will continue to rise, Johnson predicts the resulting larger banks will have boards focused on those unique challenges. "On the one hand, I think bank boards will need to be more savvy and more skilled in merger and acquisition activity," she said. "On the other side, as the asset size of the banks grows and regulatory pressures increase, they'll need to be increasingly more sophisticated in terms of the banking industry and the applicability of those regulations to their financial institution in order to mitigate risk and liability, to ensure safety and soundness." Increased regulatory pressure will be met with increasing pressure from technological changes, as well. "It's my opinion that it will result in more board turnover because directors will need to constantly stay on top of new threats that didn't exist before," Smith said. "The industry is changing so rapidly it will require a more engaged, nimble board with a much younger average age that is able to monitor technology." Just as we've seen over the past two decades, as the industry becomes more complex, the board will shoulder more responsibility to be informed. "The complexity of banking is much greater now than it's ever been," said Knight. "That requires more well-informed, better educated directors, just to deal with the complexity of it.

By, Amber Seitz

Personalized Strategic Plans
To manage board and shareholder expectations, design a strategy that fits the unique composition of your institution

Balance sheets are healthier than they've been since pre-recession years, yet earnings remain stubbornly elusive for most financial institutions. In some cases, the challenge of achieving high-performance in a banking landscape that features persistently low rates, extreme regulatory burden, and intense competition on multiple fronts creates friction in the board room. If bank management, directors and shareholders don't share expectations for the bank's performance, time and energy will be wasted on efforts that don't drive the institution toward that unified goal. The bank's strategic plan is more important than ever as it serves as the bedrock and written understanding of that shared vision and the steps to achieve it. In order to maintain buy-in with the strategic plan over the course of its three- to five-year life, the plan must reflect the unique perspectives and priorities of the bank's shareholders, directors and management.

Start with a Shared Strategy

The best – and perhaps only – way to keep management, directors and shareholders on the same page as the institution moves into the future is for all three stakeholders to start with the same goals, risk tolerance and vision for the bank. The strategic plan can be a powerful tool in clearly defining those elements, especially when all parties do not have the exact same vision. "You don't need 100 percent agreement, but you do need 100 percent buy-in," said Thom Back, senior manager at Wipfli. Ken Johnson, principal of Ken Johnson Consulting, recommends all bank directors participate in an anonymous questionnaire prior to the strategic planning process; not only does this demonstrate how the board as a whole feels about the bank's current situation, but it also allows for discussion of any items where there is a large discrepancy. "It's helpful to have everyone grounded to what others' perspectives are," Johnson explained. "That starts you off in the same place and helps you set realistic goals."

In drafting the specifics of the strategic plan, management must balance the board's performance goals with the institution's clearly defined risk tolerance. "You have to ensure that there's a balance between growth desires, capital levels, and dividend targets and understand which of those goals is the highest priority," said David Koch, president/CEO of Farin & Associates. On a more granular level, Cass Bettinger, president of Cass Bettinger and Associates, explained that strategic planning should involve the board setting a target return on equity range and capital ratio based on the bank's risk management strategy, which then enables management to calculate what the bank's target return on assets must be. It is essential for management to have a crystal clear understanding of the board's risk tolerance in order to successfully balance that equation. "If the board and management work together on that basis, at the end of the day you'll have a strategic plan that is very clear about what it's designed to produce for shareholders and what all the objectives and strategies are," Bettinger said. 

Ultimately, both the goals and risk tolerance of the bank are guided by the directors' shared understanding of the institution's mission, which should be defined with input from directors, management and shareholders. "Good strategic plans are about a lot more than just the numbers," said Elliot Berman, principal of Bowtie Advisors. "There needs to be a strategic planning process, not just a budgeting process," Berman continued. "The board should get involved at the front end of that process. At the outset, they need to provide a high-level sense of direction for management, and at the end need to approve the plan."

Understand Your Key Stakeholder Groups

While each bank has a unique composition of key stakeholders, most have three main groups: directors, executive management and shareholders. All three contribute different perspectives and skillsets to the creation of the bank's mission and the strategic plan built on that mission. Directors connect shareholder interests with management's tactics by guiding the institution at a high level. "It requires business acumen and understanding to lead the organization toward a vision that will improve the financial performance of the bank," Johnson explained. The board's role is also to use their business acumen and leadership abilities to represent the shareholder's interests. "The board's responsibility to shareholders for strategic planning is the single most important responsibility the board has," Bettinger pointed out. Paying attention to increasing shareholder value can help mitigate investor dissatisfaction with the bank's performance as well as provide management with actionable guidance. "Management gets the most out of the board when they spend 70 percent of the time looking forward," said Berman. 

Management's role is to convert the board's vision for the institution with the specific tactics bank staff will need in order to accomplish that mission, as well as to ensure that the board is properly equipped to guide the bank. "Understand the strengths, skills and relationships that each director brings to the table," said Koch. "Strengths-based management is key to a successful, engaged board." The CEO needs to be the driver in aligning the expectations of directors and shareholders to the bank's performance. "The strategic planning process has to engage the board and management, working together to fulfill the mission of the bank," said Bettinger. The best way to accomplish that, according to Johnson, is for the CEO to ensure that the bank's strategic planning process includes the right people and the right information. "It's not easy, but the CEO is the one who is charged with organizing it," he said. 

Part of ensuring the right people are included is cultivating a thorough understanding of the bank's shareholder base. "The board and management need to have an understanding of what their shareholder base is looking for, because that will influence the strategic plan," said Mark Koehl, CPA, partner at Wipfli. "Knowing the shareholder group is key to helping the bank's plan be successful." It's unwise to generalize with shareholders, and each bank will have a unique mix of investors depending on its size and ownership structure. However, there are a few categories of shareholder that many banks share: 1) mature shareholders who may be nearing retirement, and therefore are looking for dividend growth and liquidity, but also community involvement; 2) second- or third-generation shareholders, who may no longer be based in the community and therefore are primarily interested in earnings per share growth and return on equity; 3) mid-life investors who may feel disillusioned with community banking due to current political and economic headwinds, and therefore wish to maximize the bank's sale price and look for a partner. 

In addition, from each of these groups (or others that exist at your institution), sometimes activist investors arise. Between 2012 and 2014, only 8 percent of SEC filings showing at least 5 percent ownership and "activist intent" came from financial institutions. However, in 2015, that jumped to more than 17 percent. "Activist investors see the value of the bank differently than the board and management," Back said. "It doesn't translate to 'wrong,' they just have a different vision for the bank." The best way to prevent this dissonance is through consistent and clear communication between all stakeholder groups. "Activist investors make noise either because they see a financial opportunity being missed or because they care about the bank but feel like they aren't being heard," Koch explained. "Shareholders need to feel that the strategic plan reflects their needs and their input and their priorities, and the only way to do that is to engage them in the process," Bettinger agreed.

Keeping In Step

Communication and transparent monitoring are the two essential drumbeats that management should use to keep all stakeholders in step for the duration of the strategic plan. "Transparency is a very key aspect," said Back. "Not transmitting exactly what your intentions are can sometimes paint you into a corner worse than laying out the plan. It also maintains trust, which is critical." Koch also said transparency on the key goals and objectives of the plan should be a top priority. "Senior management's role comes down to consistent positive messaging with the board and staff," he said. "There's no magic there, just understanding the audience and being honest, and if the message isn't positive speak to what can be done to turn things around." Another part of management's role in open stakeholder communication is to solicit input from large shareholders on a consistent basis, especially as it pertains to the strategic plan. "CEOs and directors aren't performing their job properly if shareholders are not involved in the strategic planning process," said Johnson. This doesn't need to occur monthly, or even quarterly, but the lines of communication should never be closed. "You're not necessarily seeking out input from shareholders who aren't on the board on a frequent basis, but you have to always be open to answering questions," said Koehl. 

While responding to shareholder questions and expectations for bank performance is a complicated interaction that involves a lot of different factors, not just the strategic plan, Berman suggests using the strategic plan as a framework when communicating with shareholders. "You don't have to get into details, but use the plan and what you're doing with it as the outline," he advised. The most important feature of stakeholder communication, especially to shareholders, is the effort you put into it. "If you focus on your communication with your shareholders in the same way you focus on communication with major customers or prospective customers, you'll see results," said Berman. 

The other vital aspect of transparency is how stakeholders monitor the bank's progress in accordance with the strategic plan. This requires clear communication timing, specific numerical goals and metrics for measurement. "It's really important that management and the board discuss the timeframe," said Bettinger. "For community banks in particular, it's not about short-term profits but long-term value." Specific numerical goals can help avoid rewarding a focus on short-term gains by providing specific long-term targets. "Once you define the mission or vision, the CFO needs to put it down on paper as a pro forma balance sheet and income statement. Then you know what's supposed to be happening," Johnson advised. "While the numbers are not the plan, there do need to be specific, measurable goals," Back agreed. 

Measuring the institution's performance against those goals requires metrics and testing, because no institution will ever be in total alignment with their strategic plan at all times. "Every plan is wrong in some way," said Koch. "If it's not, your plan either isn't specific enough or you're very lucky." One popular way to quantify the alignment between the plan and performance is found by examining the key assumptions that may not be right via stress testing. "It's not about sticking one number out there as your plan. It's also about knowing the three or four most important factors in getting there," Koch explained. "In the risk management process we tend to focus mainly on what might go wrong, but it is only useful to the extent that it helps you identify what needs to go right in order for you to hit your goals." Those benchmarks and milestones are crucial signs on the roadmap of your strategic plan, so all stakeholders should be able to identify them. 

Clear communication of the bank's strategic objectives and how to track them is also how the bank leadership determines when it's time to reassess the strategic plan as a whole. "The strategic planning process isn't an annual event," said Bettinger. "It's ongoing. You always have new opportunities and new threats emerging." As those new opportunities and threats arise, it is inevitable that the strategic plan will adapt accordingly. With the joint efforts of shareholders, directors and bank management, the bank will also rise to meet them.

By, Amber Seitz

Events

Learn all about the 2023 Call Report revisions before you begin preparing the next report. Join this webinar to explore the impacts of CECL, TDRs, technical clarifications, and more. Ensure you are up to date with the changes to reporting forms and instructions — and know how to avoid common errors.

After This Webinar You’ll Be Able To:

  • Assess the impact of proposed Call Report revisions for the 2023 reporting year
  • Determine how the current expected credit loss (CECL) model impacts reporting loans, securities, and other Call Report items
  • Evaluate how the reporting of troubled debt restructured (TDR) loans in the Call Report will change as banks adopt ASU 2022-02 concerning loan modifications
  • Be on top of technical clarifications made to the Call Report instructions in 2022
  • Understand commonly misreported Call Report items, including loan and regulatory capital items

Webinar Details
Given the ever-changing accounting and regulatory landscape, it is imperative that Call Report preparers and reviewers keep up with changes to the reporting forms and instructions. The agencies continue to issue proposed and finalized changes that will impact all filers of the Call Report in 2023 and beyond. This session will highlight Call Report changes effective in 2023, in particular the new and revised items impacted by the adoption of the CECL model. In addition, the changes to reporting troubled debt restructured loans will be addressed. Join us to learn the recent Call Report changes and items that are still commonly being misreported, including an institution’s regulatory capital.

Who Should Attend?
This informative session is designed for all Call Report preparers and reviewers, including CFOs, controllers, and others responsible for ensuring the accuracy of their institution’s quarterly Call Report.

Take-Away Toolkit

  • PDF booklet of relevant accounting and regulatory guidance
  • Employee training log
  • Interactive quiz
  • PDF of slides and speaker’s contact info for follow-up questions
  • Attendance certificate provided to self-report CE credits

NOTE: All materials are subject to copyright. Transmission, retransmission, or republishing of any webinar to other institutions or those not employed by your agency is prohibited. Print materials may be copied for eligible participants only.

Presenter
Michael Gordon, CPA – Mauldin & Jenkins, LLC
Michael Gordon
is a CPA and partner in the Atlanta office of Mauldin & Jenkins, LLC. He received his bachelor’s in European History and Economics in 2003 from Vanderbilt University and received his MBA with a concentration in Accounting in 2005 from the Georgia Institute of Technology Scheller College of Business. Since joining Mauldin & Jenkins in 2005, he has focused on financial institution audits and employee benefit plans. Gordon also has experience with HUD and governmental entity audits. He is a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and the Georgia Society of Certified Public Accountants.

Registration Options

  • $245 – Live Webinar Access
  • $245 – OnDemand Access + Digital Download
  • $350 – Both Live & On-Demand Access + Digital Download

It’s not just about making deposits from afar — although that is a great accountholder benefit. Managing your mobile remote deposit capture (RDC) program is multifaceted. Do you know the risks involved? How are those risks woven into your institution’s existing risk assessment program? What about the compliance requirements? Is it time to take another look?

After This Webinar You’ll Be Able To:

  • Plan an appropriate remote deposit capture (RDC) risk assessment approach
  • Identify potential risks within your RDC program
  • Assign internal controls to mitigate your RDC risks
  • Assess next steps to improve your RDC policy
  • Review and update your RDC program procedures

Webinar Details

Remote deposit capture allows end users to make deposits safely without entering the branch. An effective RDC program starts with an RDC risk assessment. Prior to implementing RDC, senior management should identify and assess the associated legal, compliance, reputational, and operational risks. They should ensure that RDC is compatible with the institution’s business strategies, understand the return on investment, and weigh management’s ability to manage RDC’s inherent risks. Management’s evaluations of RDC systems, including products and services, should be incorporated into existing risk-assessment processes.

Who Should Attend?
This informative webinar will benefit senior management, operations staff, RDC decision-makers, and everyone involved in the RDC process.

Take-Away Toolkit

  • RDC consumer assessment form
  • Employee training log
  • Interactive quiz
  • PDF of slides and speaker’s contact info for follow-up questions
  • Attendance certificate provided to self-report CE credits

NOTE: All materials are subject to copyright. Transmission, retransmission, or republishing of any webinar to other institutions or those not employed by your agency is prohibited. Print materials may be copied for eligible participants only.

Presenter

Kimberly Ellis, AAP, APRP – UMACHA
Kimberly Ellis is the Director of Education Services for UMACHA where she provides training and support for financial institutions in the areas of payments & risk management. She graduated from Western Illinois University with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Economics. She holds the Accredited ACH Professional (AAP), and Accredited Payments Risk Professional (APRP). She spent 17 years working in community banks in Southeast Iowa before joining UMACHA in 2020. She has experience working with deposit operations & compliance, risk management, and support for corporate ACH originators.

Registration Options

  • $245 – Live Webinar Access
  • $245 – OnDemand Access + Digital Download
  • $350 – Both Live & On-Demand Access + Digital Download

Board secretaries hold the keys to the kingdom in their hands. Their actions or inactions, particularly with board minutes, can expose your financial institution to litigation, loss, and reputational damage. This thorough training will address proper procedure, compliance, and minute-taking.

After This Webinar You’ll Be Able To:

  • Understand the responsibilities of a board secretary
  • Appropriately document board oversight of your institution’s risk management program
  • Efficiently prepare the agendas and board packages
  • Track items for board review
  • Craft board minutes with the needed details
  • Understand the benefits of electronic board packages

Webinar Details

The board secretary’s dynamic role is critical. It involves and affects administration of corporate governance, director liability, communication with directors and management, oversight of policy/procedure reviews, obtaining and maintaining annual documentation, compliance issues, and more.
This session will provide the information and tools needed to be a successful board secretary. It will review responsibilities and provide best practices to enhance administration of corporate governance, including establishing an agenda, delivering the board package, scribing contemporaneous meeting notes, and documenting details in the official minutes. It will also review best practices for documenting “healthy debate” and discussion that may occur during a board meeting. Join us to receive guidance and tips for becoming more effective and efficient and get tools to facilitate success.

Who Should Attend?
This informative session is designed for board secretaries, executive assistants, senior management, and directors.

Take-Away Toolkit

  • Sample board agendas
  • Sample board reporting schedule
  • Sample board attendance log
  • Sample policy review schedule
  • Sample board training calendar
  • Employee training log
  • Interactive quiz
  • PDF of slides and speaker’s contact info for follow-up questions
  • Attendance certificate provided to self-report CE credits

NOTE: All materials are subject to copyright. Transmission, retransmission, or republishing of any webinar to other institutions or those not employed by your agency is prohibited. Print materials may be copied for eligible participants only.

Presenter

Dawn Kincaid, Brode Consulting Services Inc
Dawn Kincaid began her banking career while attending The Ohio State University. She has over 20 years’ experience in client service, operations, information technology, administrative and board relations, marketing, and compliance. Most recently Kincaid served as the Senior Vice President of Operations for a central-Ohio-based community bank, where she created and refined policies and procedures, conducted self-audits and risk assessments, and organized implementation of new products and services. Kincaid has served in the roles of Compliance, BSA/AML, CRA, Privacy, and Security Officer. She has led training initiatives, prepared due diligence information, completed a variety of regulatory applications, coordinated internal and external audits and exams, and presented for numerous state associations.

Registration Options

  • $245 – Live Webinar Access
  • $245 – OnDemand Access + Digital Download
  • $350 – Both Live & On-Demand Access + Digital Download

Have you joined the FedNow train? It’s barreling down the tracks and will be rolled out in mid-2023. This will be a huge change for the U.S. electronic payments system. Get on board and start preparing sooner rather than later. Discover more with Kevin Olsen, the payments professor.

After This Webinar You’ll Be Able To:

  • Understand the credit transfer and liquidity management participation types
  • Differentiate participation types and how they will apply to your financial institution
  • Comprehend the reconciliation process
  • Identify the different report options that will be available to participants to balance accounts
  • Understand the different use cases available with the FedNow service
  • Define a FedNow cycle date

Webinar Details
FedNow instant payments are coming in 2023 and will forever change the electronic payments landscape in the U.S. What are you doing to prepare for the biggest change in payments in decades? Join the Payments Professor to learn more about the FedNow service, participation types, liquidity management, settlement, reconciliation, and more!

Who Should Attend?
This session is best suited for directors, managers, operations personnel, and anyone who will be impacted by the FedNow service.

Take-Away Toolkit

  • Employee training log
  • Interactive quiz
  • PDF of slides and speaker’s contact info for follow-up questions
  • Attendance certificate provided to self-report CE credits

NOTE: All materials are subject to copyright. Transmission, retransmission, or republishing of any webinar to other institutions or those not employed by your agency is prohibited. Print materials may be copied for eligible participants only.

Presenter

Kevin Olsen, AAP, NCP, APRP, CHPC – VSoft Corporation
For most of the past two decades Kevin Olsen has been managing the development and delivery of education services, including in-person, web conferences, and webcasts. Olsen creates programs, presentations, and articles designed to orient and educate financial professionals on electronic payment topics. As the “Payments Professor,” he brings enthusiasm and motivation to presentations. He views the world as a classroom, which is exemplified in the “edutainment” ed-u-tain-mint (noun: when education is motivating, informative, and fun) style of training he uses to educate and inform all on the latest developments and trends in the fascinating world of electronic payments

Registration Options

  • $245 – Live Webinar Access
  • $245 – OnDemand Access + Digital Download
  • $350 – Both Live & On-Demand Access + Digital Download

With BSA, the buck stops with the board of directors, who is ultimately responsible for BSA compliance. It’s imperative that they understand how BSA applies to them, the institution, accountholders, and the products offered — because regulators are making examples of some with penalties and enforcement actions.

After This Webinar You’ll Be Able To:

  • Define the five pillars of BSA and the importance of each
  • Understand director responsibilities for establishing and reviewing the BSA program
  • Assess and manage BSA/AML risks
  • Explain the impact of pending BSA regulation and changes
  • Distinguish the key details your examiners will look for in your board reporting
  • Identify 2022 BSA/AML hot topics

Webinar Details
Ultimate responsibility for BSA compliance lies with the board of directors. They must understand the importance of BSA/AML regulatory requirements, ramifications of noncompliance, and the risks posed to their institution. Without a general understanding, the board cannot adequately provide BSA/AML oversight; approve related policies, procedures, and processes; or provide sufficient BSA/AML resources. Regulators are strongly conveying the importance of BSA compliance via recent penalties and enforcement actions against institutions without strong BSA programs. This is a must-attend session for your board and senior management team!

Who Should Attend?
This informative session is designed for directors, senior management, BSA officers, compliance officers, and internal auditors.

Take-Away Toolkit

  • Sample BSA/AML board report
  • Quick reference guide of key BSA/AML terms and requirements
  • Employee training log
  • Interactive quiz
  • PDF of slides and speaker’s contact info for follow-up questions
  • Attendance certificate provided to self-report CE credits

NOTE: All materials are subject to copyright. Transmission, retransmission, or republishing of any webinar to other institutions or those not employed by your agency is prohibited. Print materials may be copied for eligible participants only.

Presenter

Dawn Kincaid – Brode Consulting Services Inc
Dawn Kincaid began her banking career while attending The Ohio State University. She has over 20 years’ experience in client service, operations, information technology, administrative and board relations, marketing, and compliance. Most recently Kincaid served as the Senior Vice President of Operations for a central-Ohio-based community bank, where she created and refined policies and procedures, conducted self-audits and risk assessments, and organized implementation of new products and services. Kincaid has served in the roles of Compliance, BSA/AML, CRA, Privacy, and Security Officer. She has led training initiatives, prepared due diligence information, completed a variety of regulatory applications, coordinated internal and external audits and exams, and presented for numerous state associations.

Registration Options

  • $245 – Live Webinar Access
  • $245 – OnDemand Access + Digital Download
  • $350 – Both Live & On-Demand Access + Digital Download

Finding and keeping excellent officers is crucial to your bank’s success. This presentation will focus on performance-based compensation approaches that should be considered to attract and retain quality officers.

After This Webinar You’ll Be Able To:

  • Assess senior management total compensation
  • Design annual and long-term incentive plans
  • Understand how to avoid risk in annual incentive plans
  • Utilize different types and design features of equity grants
  • Better understand supplemental executive retirement plans (SERP) and employment/change-in-control agreements

Webinar Details

This presentation will examine the current compensation environment and address different performance-based incentive vehicles. You will learn the keys to effective and motivating cash incentive plans and what banks are using regarding equity-based/longer-term incentives. This session will incorporate applicable regulatory guidelines and updates surrounding incentive-based pay. Market data from Blanchard Consulting Group surveys and databases will be incorporated throughout.

Who Should Attend?

This insightful webinar will benefit senior management, directors, and human resources officers.

Take-Away Toolkit

  • Example compensation philosophy
  • Sample annual incentive plan worksheet
  • Summary of the Sound Incentive Compensation Policy regulations and how to assess risk within incentive plans
  • Pros and cons of restricted stock versus stock options
  • Employee training log
  • Interactive quiz
  • PDF of slides and speaker’s contact info for follow-up questions
  • Attendance certificate provided to self-report CE credits

NOTE: All materials are subject to copyright. Transmission, retransmission, or republishing of any webinar to other institutions or those not employed by your agency is prohibited. Print materials may be copied for eligible participants only.

Presenters

Mike Blanchard is the CEO of Blanchard Consulting Group. He has extensive experience in human resources and has conducted or supported over 500 compensation planning, market research, and organizational development projects over the past 25 years, with over 20 years specifically for the banking industry. Blanchard has presented to various banking associations including the American Bankers Association, the Bank Director Annual Compensation Conference, and several state banking associations on a variety of compensation and board governance topics. With a master’s in advanced industrial and organizational psychology, his experience includes advising clients on assessing total compensation for executives and directors, incentive planning, equity plan design, salary administration, and performance management.

Matt Brei is president of Blanchard Consulting Group. He has been a compensation consultant since 2000 and has been exclusively focused on the banking industry since 2002. Prior to founding Blanchard Consulting Group, he worked at Amalfi Consulting, Clark Consulting, and Arthur Andersen. He takes a lead role with client engagements and focuses on identifying the unique compensation needs and concerns of each client. Brei’s areas of expertise encompass multiple disciplines within executive, director, and staff compensation. He frequently speaks at banking conferences and has written a number of published articles. Brei received a bachelor’s with a double major in accounting and business management from Luther College in Decorah, Iowa.

Registration Options

  • $245 – Live Webinar Access
  • $245 – OnDemand Access + Digital Download
  • $350 – Both Live & On-Demand Access + Digital Download

Why do robbers choose one location over another? How can robbers be deterred? What life-saving steps should employees take when facing a robbery? All financial institution employees must recognize the risk that exists, and understand that knowledge and quality training are vital to survival.

After This Webinar You’ll Be Able To:

  • Use situational awareness to become safer
  • Recognize vulnerabilities within your habits and environment
  • Distinguish different robbery methods
  • Realize the importance of safe opening procedures
  • Know what steps to take during a robbery
  • Understand which actions to avoid during a robbery
  • Identify habits that endanger
  • Reduce risk

Webinar Details
There have been many changes in our country over the last couple of years. In what seems to be an increasingly violent world, how can we protect ourselves? Despite robbery being one of the most feared crimes for the banking industry, training is often lacking and uninspired. This session will go beyond basic robbery training to focus on prevention and recognizing weaknesses that can cause vulnerability. It will reveal the facts about robbery, address current trends, and provide step-by-step guidelines for effective prevention, safe response, and managing the aftereffects.

Every employee can play a role in prevention, and it is critical that all personnel are prepared and trained in the safest response methods. Attendees will learn various methods used by crooks, how their observations of the event can be valuable, and essential actions to take following a robbery.

Who Should Attend?
This must-attend webinar will benefit all financial institution employees.

Take-Away Toolkit

  • Robber description form
  • Robbery quiz
  • Before, during, and after a robbery checklist
  • Robbery basics and beyond handout material
  • Employee training log
  • Interactive quiz
  • PDF of slides and speaker’s contact info for follow-up questions
  • Attendance certificate provided to self-report CE credits

NOTE: All materials are subject to copyright. Transmission, retransmission, or republishing of any webinar to other institutions or those not employed by your institution is prohibited. Print materials may be copied for eligible participants only.

Presenter
Carol Dodgen – Dodgen Security Consulting, LLC

Carol Dodgen is the owner of Dodgen Security Consulting, LLC. Since 1998, her company has provided services including training, ATM lighting inspections, and security assessments to financial institutions, government entities, and businesses. Previously, Dodgen served as the security training officer for Compass Bank. She earned a Master’s in Criminal Justice and spent several years as an adjunct criminal justice instructor.

Dodgen is a nationally recognized speaker who has provided training for over 150,000 corporate, manufacturing, utility, law enforcement, and security personnel over the past 26 years. She holds a Crime Prevention Designation and provides instruction on crime prevention, workplace violence, and robbery. In 2009, Dodgen was appointed by the governor to the Alabama Security Regulatory Board and served for six years as vice chair.

Registration Options

  • $245 – Live Webinar Access
  • $245 – OnDemand Access + Digital Download
  • $350 – Both Live & On-Demand Access + Digital Download

October 26 – Wausau
9:00am – 2:45pm
Hilton Garden Inn Wausau
151401 County Rd Nn, Wausau

October 27 – Madison
9:00am – 2:45pm
DoubleTree by Hilton Madison East
4402 E Washington Ave, Madison

The FDIC’s Chicago Region senior staff will be conducting training for bank directors and executive management. The training will focus on current trends and hot topics impacting Wisconsin banks.

Agenda:

  • 9:00am Introduction and Regulatory Panel
  • 10:00am Break
  • 10:15am Pandemic Planning & the Impact of COVID-19
  • 11:00am  Banking and Economic Conditions
  • 12:00am Lunch
  • 1:00pm Compliance Hot Topics
  • 1:45pm Break
  • 2:00pm Cybersecurity
  • 2:45pm Closing Comments

Pandemic Planning & the Impact of COVID-19

This presentation will address interagency guidance on pandemic planning and highlight important board considerations.  We will highlight the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on bank operations, asset quality, asset/liability management, earnings, and capital, and provide some risk management takeaways.

Banking and Economic Conditions

This presentation will provide directors with an overview of local economic and banking conditions.  We address local labor, housing, and commercial real estate markets, in addition to local banking metrics.

Compliance Hot Topics

This presentation will include an overview of several current consumer protection and Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) issues that should be on the minds of bank directors.  We will provide high-level summaries in the area of CRA modernization and pandemic implications, branch closure considerations, recent third-party risk developments, the role of supervisory guidance, and electronic funds transfer error resolution.

Cybersecurity

This presentation is designed to provide directors with a high-level overview of cyber-risk, with a focus on ransomware.  We will review a typical ransomware attack and action plans, and discuss a few free tools available to assess cybersecurity risks.

Who Should Attend:

Bank directors, CEOs, and other senior banking executives who need to stay up to date on key management issues.

Registration Information:

The registration fee of $225/per attendee includes all Summit materials and meals at the event. During the registration process, you can pay with a credit card or select to be invoiced. Refund Policy: A refund, less a $25 administrative fee, is provided for cancellations requested on or before Friday, October 21, 2022.

The board secretary’s role goes far beyond being the “note taker” at board meetings. The job often entails being the chief organizer, ensuring compliance requirements are met, understanding governance issues, planning meetings, developing reports, and preserving corporate records.

This session will provide the information and tools needed to be a successful board secretary. It will review responsibilities and provide best practices to enhance administration of corporate governance, including establishing an agenda, delivering the board package, scribing contemporaneous meeting notes, and documenting the details in the official minutes. In addition, this webinar will provide guidance and tips for becoming more effective and efficient, provide tools to facilitate success, and detail best practices for documenting “healthy debate” and discussion that occurs during a board meeting.

Attendance certificate provided to self-report CE credits.

HIGHLIGHTS

Understand the board secretary’s role and responsibilities
Document board oversight of your institution’s risk management program
Prepare effective agendas and board package materials
Track items for board review
Write thorough board meeting minutes
Appropriately correct prior minutes
Explain the benefits and compliance considerations of electronic board package delivery and virtual meeting platforms

TAKE-AWAY TOOLKIT

Sample board agendas
Sample board reporting schedule
Sample board attendance log
Sample policy approval schedule
Employee training log
Interactive quiz

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?
This informative session is designed for board secretaries, corporate secretaries, senior management, and administrative personnel.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER – Dawn Kincaid, Brode Consulting Services, Inc.
Dawn Kincaid began her banking career while attending The Ohio State University. She has 20 years’ experience in client service, operations, information technology, administrative and board relations, marketing, and compliance. Most recently Dawn served as the Senior Vice President of Operations for a central-Ohio-based community bank, where she created and refined policies and procedures, conducted self-audits and risk assessments, and organized implementation of new products and services. Dawn has served in the roles of Compliance, BSA/AML, CRA, Privacy, and Security Officer. She has led training initiatives, prepared due diligence information, completed a variety of regulatory applications, coordinated internal and external audits and exams, and presented for numerous state associations.

REGISTRATION OPTIONS:

Live Webinar – $245
Recorded Webinar and Digital Download – $245 plus tax
Live Webinar, Recorded Webinar and Digital Download – $320 plus tax

Directors have overall responsibility for your institution’s BSA program, including approving the program itself, funding its budget, appointing a BSA officer, and instilling a culture of compliance. Senior management is then responsible for taking those directives and ensuring they are practiced throughout the institution.

It is imperative that directors and senior management understand the potential threats posed by money launderers and terrorist financers – and the institution’s role in preventing bad actors from accessing the US and worldwide financial system. Without a thorough understanding of how financial institutions can be used to funnel illicit proceeds, hide funds, and promote illegal activity, they cannot make informed decisions about the funding and resources necessary to meet BSA compliance requirements. Those types of failures often result in substantial penalties to institutions and individuals. This vital training will provide an overview of recent cases and enforcement actions, BSA program requirements, examiner expectations, and recent advisories and guidance regarding the ever-changing fraud and money laundering schemes.

HIGHLIGHTS

Know your institution’s BSA and OFAC responsibilities and the importance of actively supporting efforts to fulfill them
Understand the mandatory reporting requirements for CTRs, SARs, and OFAC screening in order to provide appropriate resources and support
Define money laundering, identity theft, synthetic identity fraud, and more
Explain why BSA and OFAC compliance is critical to protect the US and worldwide financial systems from money laundering, terrorist financing, and proliferation of organized criminal activity
Distinguish between lower-risk and higher-risk products, services, and accountholders and understand the need for appropriate risk-based controls

TAKE-AWAY TOOLKIT

Glossary of important BSA and OFAC terms
High-level executive summary of key BSA and OFAC components
Employee training log
Interactive quiz

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?
This informative session is designed for senior management and directors who want a succinct overview of the Bank Secrecy Act and implementing regulations to effectively oversee and provide support for the institution’s written programs.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER – Mary-Lou Heighes, Compliance Plus, Inc.

Mary-Lou Heighes is President and founder of Compliance Plus, Inc., which has assisted financial institutions with the development of compliance programs since 2000. She provides compliance training for trade associations and financial institutions. Mary-Lou has been an instructor at regulatory compliance schools, conducts dozens of webinars, and speaks at numerous conferences throughout the country.

Involved with financial institutions since 1989, Mary-Lou has over 25 years’ compliance experience. Before starting Compliance Plus in 2000, she spent five years working as a loan officer, marketer, and collector. She also worked at a state trade association for seven years providing compliance assistance and advising on state and federal legislative issues that affect financial institutions.

REGISTRATION OPTIONS

Live Webinar – $245
Recorded Webinar and Digital Download – $245 plus tax
Live Webinar, Recorded Webinar and Digital Download – $320 plus tax