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Pictured left to right are: Jovo Potkonjak, BankWork$ program manager; Foumi Sudheer; Kathryn Socher; Tiana Rivera; Adriene Wright, BankWork$ instructor; See Yang; Laretha Gransberry; Brianna Edwards; and Daryll Lund, WBA executive vice president.

The March BankWork$ class has now graduated! The Wisconsin Bankers Association is proud to partner with Employ Milwaukee to bring this nationwide program to Wisconsin. BankWork$ is a free, eight-week training program to prepare participants in primarily underserved neighborhoods for retail banking careers.

This graduating class of six included Brianna Edwards, Laretha Gransberry, Tiana Rivera, Kathryn Socher, Foumi Sudheer, and See Yang. WBA’s Daryll Lund attended the ceremony and congratulated the graduates on their achievement.

Over the eight weeks, these students learned the hard and soft skills necessary for entry-level retail and operations positions. The program began in 2019 and has so far provided more than 4,000 graduates in the Milwaukee area the opportunity to begin a career in banking.

Thank you to the following banks for sponsoring this program:

  • Associated Bank, Green Bay
  • Bank Five Nine, Oconomowoc
  • First Federal Bank of Wisconsin, Waukesha
  • First Midwest Bank, Milwaukee
  • Johnson Financial Group
  • PyraMax Bank, Greenfield
  • Spring Bank, Brookfield
  • The Equitable Bank, Wauwatosa
  • Waterstone Bank, Milwaukee
  • Wells Fargo

By Hannah Flanders

In 2008, Leah Wilson was awarded the Wisconsin Bankers Foundation (WBF) Spring Scholarship, which, at that time, was the Wisconsin Bankers Association’s (WBA) Retail Banking Section “Technical College” Scholarship. While a lot has changed since the mid-2000s not only in Wilson’s career, but also in the banking industry; some things remain absolutely the same — bankers’ commitment to their communities and to the future success of the banking industry

Between her junior and senior year in high school, Wilson began her career in banking as a teller at Mid-Wisconsin Bank in Neillsville. Shortly after, she had decided that a career in banking would align well with her passion for business and math while also allowing her to work within the office setting she had always envisioned.

In the last several years, Wilson has held many positions throughout the bank from teller to personal banker and is now assistant vice president – mortgage lender and assistant branch manager at Citizens State Bank of Loyal in Neillsville. Her expertise in the industry is a result of her dedication to bettering her community and understanding how to navigate her career path.

As she looks back upon the last 14 years in the banking industry, she credits WBA’s scholarship for her ability to further her education at Chippewa Valley Technical College (CVTC) in Eau Claire. While in the business management program, she was able to complete many courses that continue to be beneficial to her career.

In addition to the CVTC courses she pursued with the scholarship, Wilson has attended several courses offered by WBA, including Residential Mortgage Lending School and Lending Boot Camp, that have allowed continuous growth in her career. “I have learned a lot through the education opportunities provided by the WBA,” says Wilson. “I would encourage people to familiarize themselves with these opportunities and use them.”

Within the community banking environment, in which she has spent much of her career, Wilson has been able to take advantage of many opportunities offered in the bank to further explore several different departments and discover which career path was best suited for her goals and interests. The opportunities, provided in part by WBA and her bank, have allowed Wilson to take ownership of the career path she desired as well as continue to grow alongside the industry — long after the scholarship was awarded.

Ultimately, the opportunities have provided Wilson access to what she considers to be some of the “endless benefits of working in a community bank,” including the ability to build strong relationships with customers, develop deeper connections within the community, and develop her own path that aligns with her goals and interests.

Triangle Background

Dave Oldenburg

By Dave Oldenburg, fraud officer, Bank First, Watertown and member of the WBA Financial Crimes Committee

Business check cashing fraud, dubbed “operation homeless” by law enforcement, continues to impact our industry. Furthermore, it can negatively affect customer perception when fraudulent “on-us” checks are cashed at your bank.

Although there are many kinds of check fraud schemes, business check cashing fraud begins when a customer’s legitimate business checks are taken from commercial mailboxes. Often times, the compromise occurs when a customer’s outgoing mail or the recipient’s mailbox is breached. These mailboxes are often unsecured — making them an ideal target to steal checks. Once the checks are stolen, the ringleader produces quality counterfeit checks that closely resemble the features of legitimate checks. In this type of fraud, the intent is to cash as many checks as possible at numerous bank branches — sometimes pocketing tens of thousands in just one day.

The ringleader creates the checks, but recruits individuals (mules) to cash the checks if they have current and valid identification. In turn, the mules receive a small portion each time a check is paid out. In an organized fashion, these criminals travel around the state with counterfeit items, drawn on many accounts from different banks.

Fortunately, there are ways to stop fraud in its tracks. Here are some suggested “best practices” for front-line staff:

  • Compare the check to recently cleared checks as well as the signature card on file.
  • Looks for signs of traced, forged, or scanned signatures that appear irregular.
  • The current check range on recently cleared items may be considered — however a counterfeit check is often in the current range.
  • Look for recently issued identification (sometimes mules will obtain identification for the sole purpose of committing check fraud).
  • Refuse to cash the check when presented with worn or damaged identification that omits information.
  • Refuse identification that doesn’t appear to match the individual presenting the check.

Be aware of some common “red flags” that may be indicators of business check cashing fraud such as:

  • The branch location is “out of the way” from the non-customer’s address listed on the check or listed on the identification presented.
  • The person presenting the check came to the branch on foot or was dropped off.
  • The person presenting the check appears anxious, rushed, or overly chatty or name drops.
  • The person is in contact with someone on their mobile phone while the transaction is being performed.

To help mitigate your institution’s risk of loss, it is recommended that checks presented by non-customers be handled with additional scrutiny. Most importantly, if the maker of the check does not have positive pay services, consider adopting procedures where an authorized signer is contacted to validate checks over a certain dollar amount.

BankWork$ graduates (left to right) Chenille Cole, Tinamaria Adams, Sophia Strong, Jonathan Gitter, Meenakshi Das, Maxwell Sebastian, and Linda Class celebrate achievement with WBA’s executive vice president, Daryll Lund on November 18.

The November BankWork$ class has now graduated! The Wisconsin Bankers Association is proud to partner with Employ Milwaukee to bring this nationwide program to Wisconsin. BankWork$ is a free, eight-week training program to prepare participants in primarily underserved neighborhoods for retail banking careers.

This graduating class of seven included Tinamaria Adams, Linda Class, Chenille Cole, Meenakshi Das, Jonathan Gitter, Maxwell Sebastian, and Sophia Strong. WBA’s Daryll Lund attended the ceremony and congratulated the graduates on their achievement. Immediately after the graduation ceremony, a hiring event for students was held. More information on the course can be found here.

Over the eight weeks, these students learned the hard and soft skills necessary for entry-level retail and operations positions. The program began in 2018 and has so far provided more than 4,000 graduates in the Milwaukee area the opportunity to begin a career in banking.

Thank you to the following banks for sponsoring this program:

  • Associated Bank, Green Bay
  • Bank Five Nine, Oconomowoc
  • First Federal Bank of Wisconsin, Waukesha
  • First Midwest Bank, Milwaukee
  • Johnson Financial Group
  • PyraMax Bank, Greenfield
  • Spring Bank, Brookfield
  • The Equitable Bank, Wauwatosa
  • Waterstone Bank, Milwaukee
  • Wells Fargo

Upcoming education opportunities for Wisconsin bankers

Fall has arrived and schools are back in session, and that means your WBA banking schools are back in session as well! Each school offers in-depth learning experiences for various roles of staff within your bank. Each school will be held at the WBA office in Madison in our new Engagement Center! Visit www.wisbank.com/education for more information about these schools and register online to secure your teams’ seats in the schools.

Commercial Lending School | September 27-29, on-demand content starts September 1
This school was developed as an advanced-level program, assuming participants have work experience and prior training in commercial lending and/or financial statement analysis. Case studies, in-class work, instructor-led discussions and facilitation, and on-demand virtual courses are all elements of this school with an emphasis on cash flow, financial analysis, and structure.

Supervisor Boot Camp | October 4-5
This two-day dynamic, interactive workshop is just what all supervisors need – both new and experienced supervisors will benefit! The program includes exploring the coaching and leadership skills that lay out a plan for your success as a highly effective supervisor. You will find this experiential training opportunity invigorating, motivating, and applicable to managing and supervising others. Attendees will work and learn, share and listen, and go back eager to implement and make a difference.

Auditing Real Estate Loans Boot Camp | October 12-14
This program will cover everything an internal audit team needs to know in order to successfully fulfill their role. The purpose of this school is to cover all relevant aspects of the regulations impacting mortgage lending. As mortgages are the main risk area for most banks, internal audit (before the examiners arrive) is more essential than ever.

Deposit Compliance School | November 2-3
This school is designed to give you a strong foundation of the various deposit regulations affecting your bank, the current trends in compliance, and the resources you need following the school. Bank retail and branch staff will benefit from this school, in addition to compliance and audit staff.

Personal Banker School | November 8-9
This school has been designed to get your personal bankers up to speed quickly by providing them with the techniques and knowledge they need to successfully sell, cross-sell, refer, and service the banking industry's ever-expanding list of financial products. Attendees will leave the school better equipped to provide your customers with exceptional product knowledge and customer service.

Consumer Lending Boot Camp | November 18-19
This program was developed to help bankers build the foundational skills necessary to become a successful consumer lender or processor. Students will learn the process of basic lending and then put it into practice through various exercises and case studies.

Save the Date – Spring 2022 Schools!

Loan Compliance School | March 7-11, 2022

Real Estate Compliance School | March 9-11, 2022

Introduction to Commercial Lending School | March 14-16, 2022

Residential Mortgage Lending School | March 29 – April 1, 2022

School of Bank Management | May 9-13, 2022

Questions? Contact the WBA education team via email at wbaeducation@wisbank.com

 

By, Lori Kalscheuer

There are several banking relationships that might involve minors. Be it an adult who wants their child to learn about finances through a deposit account or even a loan, a fourteen year old who just got their first job at the local grocery store, or a custodial account set up by Grandpa and Grandma for college savings, banking relationships involving minor customers is no minor matter. With that pun out of the way, this article will discuss the serious considerations that bank must make, depending on the nature of the account relationship. 
 
The first question that WBA often receives regarding minors is: can minors open an account? Or to phrase it more broadly: can minors enter into a contract? The answer to both is: yes, banks can do business with minors, including opening deposit accounts and extending credit. Minors can enter into a contract. However, a minor can escape liability under the contract. Meaning, a minor could avoid liability from a bank seeking to hold a minor accountable for terms under the contract. This means that while a bank can contract with minors, doing so presents unique risks and liabilities. 
 
The ability of a minor to escape, or void, liability under a contract is often referred to as the doctrine of incapacity. Generally speaking, the theory is that a minor has not developed enough to understand the significance of contracting and thus, may void the contract. It is also worth mentioning that a court could find that someone who has attained the age of 18, or older, still hasn't matured enough to understand that significance and might be permitted to void the contract. For the above reasons, banks should consult with their policies and procedures regarding contracting with minors. 

When setting such policies, banks should consider the risks associated with opening accounts for minors. This is a matter for every bank to decide, as a matter of business. Perhaps this means that the bank does not contract with minors. Or, perhaps the bank is willing to open accounts for minors, under certain circumstances, and does so on a case-by-case basis. The bank might also find a compromise and require an adult joint owner. The theory of joint ownership would be that even if the minor can void the contract, the bank might be comfortable seeking to hold the adult liable, if the account agreement provides for joint and severable liability. Again, this is a matter that the bank must decide based upon how comfortable it is entering into contract. 

When it comes to minor accounts, WBA generally recommends that banks consider the use of a WUTMA account. A WUTMA account is created under Wisconsin’s Uniform Transfers to Minors Act, which provides certain requirements, procedures, and responsibilities. Thus, it creates a means for a bank to open an account with an understanding of what rules apply to the relationship between the minor, the adult custodian, and the bank. While WUTMA provides for this certainty, banks should be careful before opening custodial accounts which are not governed by WUTMA, as it would leave questions as to how the account would be handled. 

WUTMA describes certain types of transfers which may be made under the Act. Generally speaking, it is the custodian’s responsibility to understand the nature of the transfer, and when the funds should be released to the minor, not the bank’s. That said, there may be certain situations that a bank may need to evaluate. For example: payroll. Because payroll is income, it would not be appropriate for payroll to be deposited to a WUTMA account. 

Additionally, payment to a beneficiary who is a minor payable on death (P.O.D.) beneficiary must be done under WUTMA. Thus, banks must be aware that if a minor is named as a beneficiary, then upon death of the owner(s) of the account, the transfer must be made under WUTMA. If a custodian is not named, or is deceased with no successor custodian, then in most situations, a specific procedure must be followed. Generally speaking, in such a situation, if the minor has attained the age of 14, he or she may appoint a custodian within 60 days. If there is no custodian or successor custodian and the minor is not 14 or did not appoint a conservator within 60 days of the custodian's death, an individual must petition the court for appointment as custodian. 
 
Because the law requires P.O.D. funds to a minor to be paid under WUTMA, WBA recommends that banks encourage their customers who make such designations to indicate a custodian and potentially even a successor custodian upon designation.  

If you have any questions on this topic or other matters of compliance, contact WBA’s legal call program at 608-441-1200 or wbalegal@wisbank.com

Birrenkott is WBA assistant director – legal.

Note: The above information is not intended to provide legal advice; rather, it is intended to provide general information about banking issues. Consult your institution’s attorney for special legal advice or assistance. 

By, Cassie Krause

Seriously, how are millennials buying things? 

Are credit cards still valuable in the digital world? Great question! The answer is complicated and requires some hard truths from Ally, everyone’s favorite Millennial and voice of a generation. 

If it wasn’t clear: that is a joke; not all people born between the years 1980 and 1995 are a hive mind (most 25-year-olds have very different preferences and problems than most 40-year-olds). We don’t all think and act the same, but shared experiences in relation to the economy and technology do mean that there are trends in this age group that indicate that credit cards are becoming passé. 

Research from the Federal Reserve has shown that Millennials hold less debt than previous generations, and the distribution of that debt is different. Millennials hold more student debt but less mortgage and credit card debt than members of Gen X did at a similar age. The Federal Reserve study discusses a familiar-sounding two-pronged reason for this: supply and demand. 

On the supply side, Millennials were in their teens and twenties in the aftermath of the Great Recession when lending standards were quite tight (and remain tight in certain market segments) and lacked the necessary credit history due to age to qualify for credit cards or other borrowing. On the demand side, even if they could get credit, the financial crisis made many consumers debt-averse, particularly those who were younger during the recession. 

So how are we Millennials buying things? We’re definitely not carrying cash—one in four millennials has less than $5 cash on them at any given time. 

Everyone’s Best Friend: Debit 

Millennials prefer the other plastic: debit cards. Debit is hugely popular across all consumers; in 2018 debit card penetration was 78% in the U.S. In the millennial group, debit cards are the most common payment form, but millennials tend to lack brand loyalty.Visa found that millennials are five times more likely to close their primary banking accounts than other generational groups. This means that millennials are much more likely to move on to a different bank if they are not happy with the terms of their checking accounts. 

We’re a group accustomed to having the world at our fingertips, more likely to use mobile banking and be early adopters of new technology. Which means we’re also more open to using nonbank fintech products and services, which is displayed through how we use our debit cards. 

Let Me Count the Ways 

Sixty-one percent of consumers with a digital wallet have a debit card linked to it, and that number skews higher for younger consumers. Digital wallets, admittedly, are not being adopted as quickly as they were once thought to, but 60% of consumers used some sort of mobile payment in 2019. Additionally, companies with online or app-based services (Uber, Postmates, Airbnb) that have built-in payments saw 28.5% growth from 2018 to 2019. 

But digital wallets technically fall into the “card present” category of debit transactions, and nearly a quarter of all debit transactions were “card-not-present" in 2018. This encompasses a variety of different types of payments, including online shopping and person-to-person money transfers. 

Millennials do about 60% of their shopping online and more than half of those online purchases are made using a mobile phone. Personally, I purchase more things online through my phone than any other way. In fact, I’m not sure I would like to admit to how often I lull myself to sleep at night by scrolling through the Amazon app on my phone. 

The millennial aversion to debt expands beyond the traditional financial services—we don’t want to be in debt to our friends either. Person-to-person money transfer apps have taken off in the past few years, (the most well-known being Venmo and Zelle), but there are literally dozens on the market. Consumers transferred over $205 billion using person-to-person transfer apps in 2019, simplifying bill-splitting at restaurants everywhere. You truly haven’t lived until you’ve passive aggressively sent a friend $5 in Venmo after they insisted that you didn’t need to pay them back for coffee. 

Things That Aren’t Debit 

If you follow any former RuPaul’s Drag Race contestants on social media you’ve probably seen a #sponsoredpost or two about Klarna (shoutout to the four people reading this who know what I’m talking about). Klarna, Afterpay, Affirm, and others are buy now, pay later (BNPL) ecosystems that consumers (particularly younger consumers) are increasingly using. Millennials like the concept of being able to buy something and pay it off over time, which may cause you to scratch your head and ask “OK, but that sounds a lot like credit cards?” And you’re right, but as we discussed earlier, credit cards have too much baggage that keep younger consumers away. 

The appeal of the BNPL method is there is more transparency; these solutions are very structured, telling consumers exactly how much they will end up paying and when. Now, this isn’t a new concept by a long shot. These are really old-fashioned retail methods that have been modernized into sleek, user-friendly apps or integrated into an online retailer’s checkout process. 

Alright, Kid, So What Should We Do With This Info? 

Why, thank you for asking! This is a great time to ask some important questions about the way your bank is stepping into the digital age. Millennials are very digital, but the emerging Gen Z (typically considered those born 1996 and later) have an even higher proclivity to digital payment systems and even lower credit card usage. 

Do the products at your bank align with how your customer base prefers to move their money around? Is there a way to fight the fear of credit cards? 

Every bank’s customer-base is unique, so the answers to those questions may vary. If you’re not sure where to start looking for answers, consider asking some Millennials directly. Chances are, you have at least a few working for you today. 

Bates is WBA admin/communications assistant – legal.

By, Amber Seitz

Nick Brandoch profile
Kristen Talbott profileAll businesses exist for one reason: to serve their customers. Today, we are blessed to be able to communicate with and serve those valuable customers in more ways than ever. The challenge for brands is to be consistent with their messaging and experience across those channels, whether they be in person or through a digital environment. Achieving that goal requires a close connection and ongoing collaboration between retail and marketing, the two main customer touchpoints within our banks. 

We've been working together for the past year and a half, and these are the best practices we've used for successful collaboration. 

  1. Set the vision. Together. People have a more vested interest in goal achievement when they play a role in setting goals. We allocated time together to plan for 2019 as a team. Our initiatives are not retail or marketing initiatives; they are bank-wide goals that are supported by multiple departments. 
  2. Get friendly. Collaboration can't stop after goal setting. Ongoing communication helps us address problems, make continual improvements, and keep goals top of mind. Nicholas joins the regular meeting of our retail leadership to provide marketing updates, take feedback, and ensure lines of communication always remain open. With more time spent in the branch network, Kristen and her team help audit branch merchandising and communicate opportunities to marketing.
  3. United we stand. Once you figure out what you want to accomplish, together, you have additional resources when presenting opportunities to bank leadership. When you've found consensus between retail and marketing, you'll find it substantially easier to find commitment from the top to execute your shared vision. 
  4. Make the tent bigger. When the retail team was facing staffing shortages, marketing developed hiring campaigns to help drive qualified applicants. This led to a new hire starting within the first two weeks. When marketing needed employees to support events, retail recruited front-line employees to be offsite brand ambassadors. They were able to share bank knowledge with potential customers, and now share greater marketing knowledge with fellow employees. Solutions exist beyond department boundaries. Be sure to push the boundaries and ask for help. 
  5. That computer in your pocket makes calls. Really. Don't forget how critical your Call Center is to a great customer experience. Trust can be lost when call center employees are unfamiliar with initiatives or key advertising. Share those campaigns ahead of time so the customer has an omni-channel experience. 
  6. Maximize your sponsorships. In a community bank, sponsorship opportunities arise from the extensive network that our bankers and lenders keep. To maximize these investments, teamwork is required. Retail can help activate marketing sponsorships within the branch, encouraging customer engagement as well as reinforcing our community niche. Conversely, marketing can use its expertise to negotiate and leverage partnerships that originate from the retail team for the greatest impact. 

Harmony can be elusive. Building trust is hard. It takes a concerted effort to keep retail and marketing rowing their oars in the same direction. Occasionally, your boat will take a circuitous route. We believe these best practices can help you arrive at your final destination. 

Talbott is chief retail banking officer for Tri City National Bank and serves on the WBA Marketing Committee. Bandoch is vice president of marketing for Tri City National Bank.

By, Amber Seitz

Events

The WBA Branch Manager Boot Camp will include 4 virtual half-day sessions. Sessions will be held on Zoom from 8:00–11:00 a.m. CT on May 24, June 28, July 26, and August 30.

About the Program:
Want to grow your total assets in excess of 20% year-over-year? Wish to grow your deposit base by more than 20%? Then consider an investment in training your branch managers in our Branch Manager Bootcamp!

What does your branch have that alternate branch channels and non-bank competitors don’t? The branch has you and your people. As the number of branch transactions continues to fall, community banks and credit unions must reassess the role of the branch manager. Companies must invest in the manager, giving him or her the right people, tools, client goals, and sales goals, and step back and watch the results change into a dynamic source of profitability.

This exciting, four-part series will focus on the next generation manager who will be leading the transition to client relationship management, and to managing an active advisory environment for the client to achieve financial goals. The next generation manager will be leading this vital transformation.

The program will focus on the critical skills and expectations that need to be developed to ensure that the next generation branch manager will exceed expectations and goals set for him or her. Participants will engage in discussions, small group activities, and skills practices to ensure that ideas are shared and learning is entertaining and adopted.

Who Should Attend:
New and experienced Branch Managers, Assistant Branch Managers, Teller Supervisors, Lead Frontline Professionals, and any professional aspiring to lead the team in a retail branch.

About the Speaker:
Jennie Sobecki
is the owner and CEO of Focused Results, a sales and marketing strategy, consulting and training firm concentrating on results-driven process consulting and training experience in community banks and other financial institutions. An expert in designing and implementing sales efforts and processes, Sobecki designs solutions to drive top line growth through better utilization and training of existing sales forces, including sales management.

Sobecki is a graduate of Indiana University and has a certificate in consulting services from Ball State University. Before joining Focused Results, Sobecki was director of sales and marketing for a $3 billion bank holding company, sales manager for a high-performing mid-level Indianapolis bank, and director of corporate training for a large Midwest insurance company.

Registration Information:
The registration fee of $800/attendee includes program registration for each of the four sessions, instruction and electronic materials. Upon completion of all four sessions, attendees will receive a certificate of completion for the Branch Manager Boot Camp.

WBA Personal Banker School has been designed to get your personal bankers up to speed quickly by providing them with the techniques and knowledge they need to successfully sell, cross sell, refer, and service the banking industry’s ever expanding list of financial products. Attendees will leave the school better equipped to provide your customers with exceptional product knowledge and customer service.

Curriculum Includes:

  • Compliance Overview – focusing on regulations and laws that every personal banker should know.
  • Account Titling – covering individual and joint accounts, trusts, minor accounts, POAs, PODs and business accounts.
  • Understanding the Financial Side of Banking – understanding the business of banking and the retail bankers role in overall bank profitability.
  • Building & Maintaining Relationships – assessing customer needs, identifying opportunities and building relationships with your customers.
  • Steps for Successful Sales, Cross-Sells and Referrals
  • Kick Starting High Performance – understanding your role at the bank and having the skills that are necessary to achieve your goals and exceed performance expectations.
  • Group case study and in-class activities to apply what you have learned.

School Faculty:

  • Scott Birrenkott, Assistant Director-Legal, Wisconsin Bankers Association
  • Jennifer Pieper, Principal, JPieper Consulting

Who Should Attend?
This school was developed for Personal Bankers, New Accounts Personnel, and others who manage retail account relationships. Both new and experienced staff will benefit.

Course Requirements:
Attendees will be expected to attend and participate in all school sessions, complete all pre-school assignments, and participate actively in group and class discussions.

Decision making in uncertain times drives future earnings, valuation, and overall relevance.  In this session we will explore common traits and actions of several high performing community banks during past crises to assess their decisions versus the rest of the field to enlighten our process in today’s market.

Target Audience: CEOs, CFOs, ALCO members, controllers, chief risk officer, chief retail, funding officers

Presenter
Dave Koch, Abrigo

Registration Option
Live presentation $330

Recording available through July 20, 2022

Is your ALCO doing all it can to drive performance? Are we actively managing risk levels for performance goals, or simply ensuring compliance with our limits? It is time to re-examine the role of ALCO and how the measurement and management of risk should lead to decision making in financial institutions. Gone are the days of silo-based risk measures and contingency plans. In this session we will present Asset/Liability Management in the ERM sense with a focus on the measurement and management of capital needs. We will review stress testing concepts for interest rate, liquidity and credit risks and build the framework for effective capital contingency planning including a review of policies and processes to support. Participants will take back a new perspective on the role of ALCO in risk management and the capital planning process.

Learning Objectives:

  • Build a Framework for Capital Planning and ALM
  • Review approaches to stress testing individual risk
  • Build a framework for integrated enterprise stress testing
  • Examine how to use Static & Dynamic scenario analysis and stress tests

Target Audience: CEOs, CFOs, ALCO members, controllers, chief risk officer, chief retail, and funding officers

Presenter
Richard Hamm, Advantage Consulting & Training

Registration Option
Live presentation $330

Recording available through June 10, 2022

It is universally understood that asset\liability management (ALM) is a critical function for management of your financial institution’s performance.  Understanding and measuring the financial risks assumed by your institution and the associated rewards is the essence of good financial management.

For decades, industry net interest margins have under pressure due to lower interest rates and increased competition.  With growing pressure from non-bank players offering “banking” services, using the ALM process to measure and more importantly, MANAGE, your performance and risks to your institution’s return has never been greater.

This course provides attendees with a basic understanding of the asset\liability management process.  In the session we cover the role of Asset/Liability Management (ALM) as well as the fundamental components to an effective ALM process to measure and manage key risks.

This webinar will cover

  • The role of the ALM process in financial institutions
  • Options to measure risks we care about in the ALM process
  • Measurements do we use to address ALCO risks,
  • The common faults in community FI risk assessments

Participants will

  • Understand the overall framework of Asset/Liability Management
  • Analyze the key risk areas ALCO must manage
  • Explain the role of income simulation, duration and economic value measures
  • Explain the different between static and dynamic value at risk measurements
  • Define Income at risk and value at risk
  • Understand the role of liquidity risk management
  • Outline key variables impacting the results

Target Audience
CEOs, CFOs, ALCO members, controllers, chief risk officer, chief retail, funding officers.  This session is intended for individuals that are new to the ALM process.

Presenter
Susan Sharbel, Abrigo

Registration Option
Live presentation $330

Recording available through May 2, 2022

Virtual currency continues to emerge as a hot button for BSA/OFAC risk. In this session, you will learn how virtual currency operates and its place in the fiat currency world. We will provide details on the U.S. banking system’s role in processing these transactions and upcoming regulatory changes that will allow financial institutions to serve as currency exchangers. We will also review how to differentiate investors from exchangers and provide guidance on how to identify these  transactions. We will discuss FinCEN and the U.S. Treasury advisories regarding the risk virtual currency transactions could present and explore monitoring protocols and SAR filing responsibilities relating to virtual currency transactions.

Target Audience
Anyone involved in virtual currency transactions

Presenter
Robin Guthridge, Wipfli LLP

Registration Option
Live presentation $275

Recording available through April 25, 2022

Traditional tools such as Past Due Reports and Overdraft Reports are reactive for portfolio risk.  This program provides detailed discussion of how to proactively identify risk in your Pass-rated loan portfolio and maintain a strong credit culture.

Topics include

  • LPM perspective vs. credit risk management
  • Does your credit culture need cultivating?
  • 7 ways to use leading indicators in risk management (handout)
  • Strengthening your 3 lines of defense
  • Organizing & tracking policy exceptions
  • Co-variance of risk.

Target Audience
CEOs, CFOs, ALCO members, controllers, chief risk officer, chief retail, funding officers.

Presenter
Mike Wear, 39 Acres Corporation

Registration Option
Live presentation $330

Recording available through April 20, 2022

LEAD360_Banner

Join WBA and your fellow retail, sales, and marketing peers from across Wisconsin for the gathering of the WBA LEAD360 Conference! The Conference will kick off on November 16 at 9:30 a.m. and adjourn at noon on November 17. This conference is for your retail bankers, sales/marketing bankers and financial literacy bankers.
Bank Member Registration:
The registration fee is $350 per first attendee. Each additional attendee from your bank is an $300 per additional attendee in person.

Registration includes networking meals and breaks, general sessions, breakout sessions, and access to the summit mobile app.

Day Two Only Registration is $100 per attendee.

*To receive the published discount, you must register everyone at the same time.
Associate Member Registration:

Associate Members are encouraged to send their staff as well! The same registration fee is available to WBA Associate Members.

Interested in upgrading your presence? Register to be a conference sponsor to receive additional benefits and conference recognition!
Booth Information

Your exhibit booth includes:

  • Access to conference attendee list — each bank will have multiple staff registered, bank titles will be included
  • 1 – 6-ft. table in exhibit hall, with space allowing for an 8’x10′ exhibit display
  • Company name, contact information, and description listed in the conference mobile app
  • “Exhibitor” ribbon on name badge
  • Networking opportunity with 100+ Wisconsin bankers!

WBA Associate Member Registration:
Exhibit Booth with 2 Attendees – $600

Non-Member Registration:
Exhibit Booth with 2 Attendees – $1,000

Principles of Banking is intended to give those who are new to banking a general understanding of the industry. Recognized as the most comprehensive introduction to the banking industry for over 40 years, it introduces fundamental banking concepts and principles, the basics of how banks operate as service providers and businesses, their obligation to operate in a safe and sound manner and manage risks, and the responsibilities of bank employees in a customer-focused financial services environment. 

WBA will host the course in two locations during fall 2021, October 13-14 in Madison and October 20-21 in Rothschild (Wausau area). Each two-day session starts at 8:30 a.m. and adjourns at 4:30 p.m. daily.

View the Agenda on the registration site to see what is covered in Principles of Banking.

Speaker:
Peggy Zickert, VP/Regional Operations Leader, National Exchange Bank & Trust

Who Should Attend?
This course is recommended for personnel new to banking at all levels or those who just need a refesher.

Registration Information:
The registration fee of $550/person includes all workshop materials, a hard copy of the 12th edition Principles of Banking textbook, and daily refreshment breaks and lunch. Register early as space is limited!

Course Credit:
Principles of Banking may be applied to many ABA Certificate and Diploma online programs. This course is recommended for one ABA Credit.

https://cvent.me/mAev89?RefId=WBAweb

$550

Principles of Banking is intended to give those who are new to banking a general understanding of the industry. Recognized as the most comprehensive introduction to the banking industry for over 40 years, it introduces fundamental banking concepts and principles, the basics of how banks operate as service providers and businesses, their obligation to operate in a safe and sound manner and manage risks, and the responsibilities of bank employees in a customer-focused financial services environment.

WBA will host the course in two locations during fall 2021, October 13-14 in Madison and October 20-21 in Rothschild (Wausau area). Each two-day session starts at 8:30 a.m. and adjourns at 4:30 p.m. daily.

View the Agenda on the registration site to see what is covered in Principles of Banking.

Speaker:
Peggy Zickert, VP/Regional Operations Leader, National Exchange Bank & Trust

Who Should Attend?
This course is recommended for personnel new to banking at all levels or those who just need a refesher.

Registration Information:
The registration fee of $550/person includes all workshop materials, a hard copy of the 12th edition Principles of Banking textbook, and daily refreshment breaks and lunch. Register early as space is limited!

Course Credit:
Principles of Banking may be applied to many ABA Certificate and Diploma online programs. This course is recommended for one ABA Credit.