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Following a strong start to 2022, Wisconsin banks rounded out the second quarter of the year with total assets up 1.81% quarter over quarter from March 31, 2022 to June 30, 2022 and total assets up 5.54% year over year from June 30, 2021 to June 30, 2022, according to the latest numbers released by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). Total deposits remained stable quarter over quarter (-0.28%) and were up 5.76% year over year. Noncurrent loans and leases continued on a significant downward trend, indicating consumers’ ability to pay down debt amidst inflation concerns.

Notable indicators include:

  • Residential lending increased over 5% year over year and quarter over quarter. Despite the Fed’s interest rate hikes, mortgage rates remain at historically low levels.
  • Commercial lending is back to where it was a year ago after seeing decreases due to supply chain issues and worker shortages. A 7.80% quarter-over-quarter increase in commercial and industrial loans indicates business owners’ renewed focus on growth.
  • Farm loans increased 19.27% quarter over quarter and 4.09% year over year. Farmers who had financed their own expenses in recent years — due to stimulus packages and strong balance sheets — are increasingly looking to borrow with high input costs such as fuel and fertilizer and less favorable outlooks for 2023.
  • Credit quality continues to improve as more borrowers are keeping up to date with their payments. Noncurrent loans and leases decreased 21.33% year over year and 11.04% quarter over quarter.

Statement on the release of second-quarter 2022 Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) numbers from Rose Oswald Poels, president and CEO of the Wisconsin Bankers Association: 

“Wisconsin banks continue to meet the borrowing needs of consumers and business owners alike. Bankers understand the changing economy coming out of the pandemic and are working with their customers who are looking to purchase homes and grow their businesses. During this time of heightened inflation and ongoing global concerns, Wisconsinites can feel confident in their bank as a safe place to deposit their money and a trusted partner in meeting their financial goals.”

FDIC-Reported Wisconsin Numbers (Dollar Figures in Thousands)

Commentary by PNC Chief Economist Gus Faucher

Real gross domestic product (GDP) fell 0.9% at an annual rate in the second quarter of 2022, according to the advance estimate from the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA); this followed a 1.6% decline in the first quarter. This is the first time GDP has contracted in two consecutive quarters since the first half of 2020, when the pandemic came to the U.S.

The big drag came from inventories, which subtracted 2 percentage points from growth. Trade was a major positive adding 1.4 percentage points to growth in the quarter as the trade deficit declined. Exports rose a very strong 18% while imports rose just 3%; higher imports subtract from GDP. Consumer spending rose 1.0% adjusted for inflation, adding 0.7 percentage point to growth. Goods spending fell 4.4% in the quarter, with declines for both durable and nondurable goods, but services spending rose 4.1%.

Business fixed investment was essentially flat in the second quarter, with a big increase in investment in intellectual property products almost offsetting declines in investment in structures and equipment. Housing investment was a major drag, subtracting 0.7 percentage point from growth, as higher interest rates weighed on homebuilding and repairs and renovations. Government subtracted 0.3 percentage point from growth, with small declines in federal and state and local government spending.

On a year-ago basis real GDP was up 1.6% in the second quarter, down from 3.5% growth in the first quarter.

Final sales of domestic product — GDP minus the change in inventories, which measures demand for goods and services produced in the U.S. — increased 1.1% in the second quarter, following a 1.2% decline in the first quarter.

The National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) is the widely accepted arbiter of recessions in the U.S. according to the NBER, a recession is “a significant decline in economic activity that is spread across the economy and that lasts more than a few months.” The NBER explicitly states that two consecutive quarters of contraction in GDP does not necessarily equate to recession. Instead, the NBER considers many economic series, including personal income (excluding government transfer payments) and consumer spending, both adjusted for inflation; employment; wholesale and retail sales, also adjusted for inflation; and output in manufacturing, mining, and utilities.

Using these indicators, the economy was expanding through the second quarter. The second quarter GDP results reaffirm this view, with consumer spending and final sales of domestic product both up moderately, and with inventories the major drag on growth. Demand remains solid.

Strong job growth is another indication that the economy is expanding in mid-2022; the economy added 375,000 jobs per month on average in the second quarter. Additionally, the decline in real GDP (unannualized) in the first half of 2022 was 0.7%; it is unclear if this would meet the NBER’s definition of a “significant” decline. And an alternative measure of the size of the economy, real gross domestic income (the income going to households and firms from economic activity) rose in the first quarter; the BEA will release the first read on real GDI for the second quarter next month. Real personal income excluding transfer payments rose slightly in the second quarter.

The GDP price index rose 8.7% annualized in the second quarter, up from 8.2% in the first quarter. The personal consumption expenditures price index increased 7.1% in the second quarter, the same pace as in the first quarter. The core PCE price index, excluding food and energy prices, rose 4.4% in the second quarter, down from 5.2% in the first quarter. The PCE price indices are the Federal Reserve’s preferred inflation measures and are running much higher than the central bank’s 2% objective. The central bank is raising interest rates in an effort to slow growth and bring down inflation.

Economic growth slowed in the first half of 2022, but the U.S. economy is not in recession. Demand, especially from consumers, remains solid, thanks to the very good labor market and about $2 trillion in extra saving relative to before the pandemic, and despite the drags from inflation and higher interest rates. Consumer spending is shifting from goods to services; consumers bought a lot of goods in the initial recovery from the pandemic and don’t need as many now and are feeling more comfortable going out and spending on services.

Despite a very small decline in the second quarter, business investment demand remains solid. A narrowing trade deficit will also contribute to solid economic growth in the second half of 2022. Housing will remain a drag, however, as higher mortgage rates continue to weigh on the housing market. PNC expects annualized growth in the second half of 2022 of around 2%, with growth slowing to around 1% in 2023 and 2024 as higher interest rates continue to weigh on the economy.

Although the U.S. economy continues to expand, recession risks are elevated, with a probability of around 45% over the next couple of years; this is more than double the probability before the Russian invasion of Ukraine. The risk is that Fed interest rate increases to reduce inflation could lead to an outright contraction in economic activity, either in late 2022 or sometime in 2023.

WBA Releases Results of Bank CEO Economic Conditions Survey

In the Wisconsin Bankers Association’s biannual Economic Conditions Survey of Wisconsin bank CEOs, 71% of respondents rated Wisconsin’s current economic health as “excellent” or “good.This marks a decline from the mid-year 2021 survey, when 91% of survey respondents gave “excellent” or “good” ratings. Nearly all (over 98%) of the Wisconsin bank CEOs who completed the most recent survey predict that the economy will stay the same or weaken in the next six months. 

“Wisconsin bank CEOs have a unique vantage point in that they are both financial experts and highly involved individuals in their local communities,” said WBA President and CEO Rose Oswald Poels. “While the economy remains relatively stable, bankers are keeping a close eye on important indicators and stand ready to support their customers through possible economic challenges over the coming months. 

Among the economic bright spots cited by bank CEOs in the survey were strong tourism, construction, manufacturing, and agricultural industries. Survey results indicate that the hiring market and real estate market are cooling down. Top economic concerns reported by bank CEOs were inflation, cost of living/childcare/education, rising interest rates, oil and gas prices, staffing shortages, and the war in Ukraine.

The midyear 2022 survey was conducted May 24–June 10 with 56 respondents. Sums may not equal 100 percent due to rounding. Below is a breakdown of the survey questions and responses.

Wisconsin Bank CEO Economic Conditions Survey Results
How would you rate the current health of the Wisconsin economy. . .  Mid-Year 2022  End-of-Year 2021  Mid-Year 2021 
Excellent  7%  6%  15% 
Good  64%  73%  76% 
Fair  29%  20%  10% 
Poor  0%  1%  0% 
         
In the next six months, do you expect the Wisconsin economy to. . .        
Grow  2%  21%  48% 
Weaken  63%  15%  39% 
Stay the same  36%  64%  13% 
         
Over the next six months, do you expect inflation to. . .       
Rise  50%     
Fall  22%     
Stay about the same  28%     
       
How likely would you say a recession is in the next six months?       
Very unlikely  4%     
Unlikely  16%     
Neutral  20%     
Likely  45%     
Very likely  16%     
       
Rate the current demand in the following categories:        
Business Loans        
Excellent  2%  9%  10% 
Good  48%  48%  30% 
Fair  48%  39%  52% 
Poor  2%  5%  8% 
         
Commercial Real Estate Loans        
Excellent  7%  11%  13% 
Good  52%  44%  44% 
Fair  36%  41%  33% 
Poor  5%  4%  10% 
         
Residential Real Estate Loans        
Excellent  2%  25%  40% 
Good  20%  48%  48% 
Fair  50%  24%  12% 
Poor  29%  3%  0% 
         
Agricultural Loans        
Excellent  2%  1%  2% 
Good  37%  22%  34% 
Fair  51%  58%  56% 
Poor  10%  18%  8% 
         
Deposit       
Excellent  5%     
Good  55%     
Fair  38%     
Poor  2%     
       
In the next six months, do you anticipate the demand for the following categories will. . .        
Business Loans        
Grow  11%  28%  43% 
Weaken  48%  14%  7% 
Stay the same  41%  59%  51% 
         
Commercial Real Estate Loans        
Grow  13%  24%  31% 
Weaken  48%  21%  8% 
Stay the same  39%  55%  31% 
         
Residential Real Estate Loans        
Grow  4%  11%  14% 
Weaken  63%  56%  41% 
Stay the same  34%  33%  46% 
         
Agricultural Loans        
Grow  6%  15%  18% 
Weaken  31%  14%  6% 
Stay the same  63%  71%  76% 
         
Deposit       
Grow  11%     
Weaken  36%     
Stay the same  53%     
       
In the next six months, are the businesses in your bank’s market area likely to. . .        
Hire employees  31%  68%  82% 
Maintain current staffing levels  61%  33%  15% 
Lay off employees  7%  0%  3% 
         
In the next six months, is your bank likely to. . .        
Hire employees  34%  55%  48% 
Maintain current staffing levels  63%  43%  45% 
Lay off employees  4%  3%  6% 

Wisconsin banks started the year 2022 strong with total assets up 5.04% year over year from March 31, 2021 to March 31, 2022. Despite concerns about rising inflation, total deposits were up 7.08% for the same period. The financial health of consumers was also evidenced by a 20.88% year-over-year decrease in noncurrent loans and leases.

Notable indicators include:

  • Residential lending slowed only slightly as the housing market remained a hot sellers’ market.
  • Commercial lending decreased 14.42% year over year. Supply chain issues and worker shortages continue to inhibit business growth and cause hesitancy among business owners to take out loans.
  • Credit quality continues to improve as more borrowers are keeping up to date with their payments. Noncurrent loans and leases decreased 20.88% year over year and 5.69% quarter over quarter.

Statement on the release of first-quarter 2022 Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) numbers from Rose Oswald Poels, president and CEO of the Wisconsin Bankers Association:

“Wisconsin’s banking industry stands poised to meet the banking needs of Wisconsinites in 2022 as government pandemic relief funding phases out. Bankers will be keeping a close eye on global supply chain and geopolitical issues as well as the Fed’s rising interest rates going into the rest of the year.”

FDIC-Reported Wisconsin Numbers (Dollar Figures in Thousands)

Yellow triangle background

Indicators reflect a healthy financial environment for Wisconsin consumers and banks 

Wisconsin banks demonstrated a strong performance at the end of 2021, while navigating the ongoing effects of the pandemic. Total assets were up 8.45% year over year from December 2020 to December 2021 and 1.16% quarter over quarter from September 2021. The financial health of consumers was evidenced by a 10.88% year-over-year increase in deposits as well as a 24.75% decrease in noncurrent loans and leases. 

Notable indicators include: 

  • Residential lending slowed slightly as the housing market began to stabilize. 
  • Commercial lending saw only a slight quarter-over-quarter increase. Some business owners had fewer borrowing needs, while others remained hesitant to borrow as their growth was hindered by supply chain issues and worker shortages. 
  • Credit quality trends continued, with borrowers largely keeping up to date on their loans and leases. 

Statement on the release of fourth-quarter 2021 Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) numbers from Rose Oswald Poels, president and CEO of the Wisconsin Bankers Association:  

“Wisconsin’s banking industry remains in a solid position as the economy continues to steadily rebound from the onset of the pandemic. While Russia’s invasion of Ukraine casts uncertainty on the 2022 global economy, the overall financial outlook is positive.” 

FDIC-Reported Wisconsin Numbers (Dollar Figures in Thousands)

    

Ken Thompson Headshot By Kenneth D. Thompson, WBA Board chair, president and CEO of Capitol Bank, Madison

After the challenges of the last several years, I believe I speak for everyone when I say I am continually amazed by the optimism that Wisconsin bankers hold not only for the growth of our industry, but for our economy and communities as well. Although the COVID-19 pandemic continues to wreak havoc, I expect 2022 to be a year of immense growth and transition within our industry.

As bankers, we are fortunate to have a unique perspective on our economy and communities. As many member CEOs highlighted in WBA’s recent Economic Conditions survey, despite recent obstacles, a majority of Wisconsin bankers rate the current health of the economy as ‘good’ and predict this to stay the same well into 2022.

Our work in providing flexibility to our staff and customers, as well as exceeding expectations of managing liquidity and technological growth in 2021, has absolutely aided in our efforts to provide stability in times of uncertainty. Our industry will continue to be challenged into 2022 as we face inflation; ongoing COVID protocols surrounding vaccinations, boosters, and possible mandates; as well as talent retention.

However, as mentioned repeatedly by Minneapolis Federal Reserve Bank President and CEO Neel Kashkari during WBA’s annual Midwest Economic Forecast Forum, Wisconsin’s economy and our region as a whole has been on par with the recovery of the nation. Efforts by our community banks have not gone unnoticed and have played, and will continue to play, a substantial role in rebounding our economy.

Of course, innovation will remain the name of the game as banks navigate uncertainty. The next eleven months will certainly show the flexibility, creativity, and expertise of banks in Wisconsin and set our industry apart.

Minneapolis Fed President Neel Kashkari and Economist Dr. David Kohl Headline Midwest Economic Forecast Forum 

By Cassandra Krause, Wisconsin Bankers Association 

On January 4, the Wisconsin Bankers Association hosted the 2022 Midwest Economic Forecast Forum in partnership with the Illinois Bankers Association, Michigan Bankers Association, Minnesota Bankers Association, Montana Bankers Association, and South Dakota Bankers Association. The event kicked off with a presentation by Minneapolis Federal Reserve Bank President and CEO Neel Kashkari. His presentation was followed by a town hall-style Q & A, moderated by WBA President and CEO Rose Oswald Poels. The conversation included topics such as the conditions in sectors like manufacturing, agriculture, and construction; the Fed’s dual mandate from Congress; supply chains; an influx in bank deposits; and Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) modernization. 

Kashkari on webinar

Minneapolis Fed President Neel Kashkari

 

Wisconsin’s Recovery Slower Than Minnesota’s, But Regional Recovery Mirrors That of the Nation 

Kashkari said that overall, our region looks a lot like the nation, but there are differences. Wisconsin started recovering more quickly than Minnesota did, but then the recovery became slower over the last six months to year. What happens with COVID will continue to matter because workers getting sick will be a disruption to economic activity. 

Kashkari noted that economic recovery since initial COVID-19 shutdowns has been uneven. “On one hand, GDP is fully recovered. . . but different sectors have been affected differently,” said Kashkari. “Many workers have found jobs. . . and while the unemployment rate has come down, we are still about 4–6 million workers short of where we should be, had there been no pandemic.”   

Demand for Labor Has Recovered More Quickly Than Supply  

The labor market was one of the main topics Kashkari responded to in the Q & A. 

“One of the things that I learned before the pandemic was that the vast majority of Americans want to work,” said Kashkari. “Every time businesses told us ‘we’re out of workers,’ as wages started to climb, workers came back in, and that was resoundingly positive for everyone. . . I still believe that’s true.”  

Kashkari commented that people of all income levels have more savings and more options — and there’s still a lot of fear of getting COVID or bringing it home to a vulnerable family member. The demand for labor has come back, but it’s going to take longer for people to feel comfortable coming back into the job market.  

Two Rate Hikes Likely in 2022 

With regard to inflation, Kashkari predicted it will be transitory, though it has been higher and has lasted longer than he had expected. He referred to his essay, titled “Two Opposing Risks,” which was published just prior to his presentation, and said he foresees two interest rate hikes this year. The rate rises may require sacrificing some gains in employment in order to keep inflation under control. 

Role of Banks in Communities Highly Appreciated 

Kashkari highlighted how community banks stepped up powerfully through the Paycheck Protection Program. “[Banks] have managed exceptionally well during the pandemic,” he said, adding that he has nothing but admiration for community banks and the role they served. WBA’s Oswald Poels expressed gratitude on behalf of community bankers for the recognition of their efforts. 

Kohl and Oswald Poels

Dr. David Kohl and Rose Oswald Poels

Economic Mega Trends 2022 and Beyond 

Dr. David Kohl, a highly anticipated speaker at events hosted by WBA and state banking associations around the country, discussed ten global macro-economic mega trend disruptors. The renowned economist and professor emeritus at Virginia Tech also responded to audience questions in a dialog moderated by Oswald Poels. 

Disruptors Present Both Challenges and Opportunities 

Some of the major disruptors Kohl highlighted in his presentation were globalization; environmental, social, and governance (ESG); and technology and automation. He provided a recent historical overview of inflation and provided a watch list for short- and long-term inflation. “Uncertainty concerning inflation, geopolitics, supply and marketing chains creates challenges but also presents opportunities,” said Kohl. “This is true for businesses and individuals with a high business and financial IQ that follow the process and execute a business plan.” 

Global Perspective Key to Success 

Kohl gave an overview of markets around the globe to keep an eye on, including Asia/China and Europe/Russia. “’Think globally, but act locally’ is a theme for success in the decade of the 2020s,” advised Kohl. “Observe economic mega trends from afar and connect the dots to determine how they impact your bank, business, employees, and customers’ lives.”   

Wisdom for Banking 

Like any good educator, Kohl had words of wisdom to share with the audience beyond what can be found in textbooks and data reports. “Success in life and business is about managing the controllables and managing around the uncontrollables,” he explained. “From the board room to business front lines, one cannot manage what happens in Washington, D.C., Beijing, or Brussels, but can attempt to manage around uncontrollable factors using scenario planning. Focus energy and strategy on the controllable elements with tactics that are agile and adaptive given the economic landscape.” 

If you were unable to attend the live broadcast, you can still register to receive access to the recording through January 18, 2022 plus resources provided by Kashkari and Kohl. 

Wisconsin Experts Offer Sector Forecasts 

As an extension of the Midwest Economic Forecast Forum, WBA has compiled eight sector-specific reports from industry experts on what 2022 will hold for Wisconsin. The reports include insights from Rose Oswald Poels, Wisconsin Bankers Association; Robb Kahl, Construction Business Group; Kevin Krentz, Wisconsin Farm Bureau Federation; Brandon Scholz, Wisconsin Grocers Association; Eric Borgerding, Wisconsin Hospital Association; Kurt Bauer, Wisconsin Manufacturers & Commerce; Michael Theo, Wisconsin Realtors Association; and Tom Still, Wisconsin Technology Council. 

To read the full Wisconsin Economic Report, please visit wisbank.com/2022forecast. 

Events

The Banking Industry is an essential introduction to the business of banking. The course covers the evolution of banking since the 2008 financial crisis, the role of banks in the U.S. economy and the environment in which banks operate and compete. It provides a look into various banking career tracks to inspire and prepare and motivate new bankers and covers innovations in financial products.

Audience: Anyone who needs an introduction to banking, whether just starting a career or a more experienced professional from a different industry.

Price: $215

The Banking Industry is an essential introduction to the business of banking. The course covers the evolution of banking since the 2008 financial crisis, the role of banks in the U.S. economy and the environment in which banks operate and compete. It provides a look into various banking career tracks to inspire and prepare and motivate new bankers and covers innovations in financial products.

Audience: Anyone who needs an introduction to banking, whether just starting a career or a more experienced professional from a different industry.

Price: $215

A fundamental study of how money functions in the U.S. and world economies. How money supply, the banking system, the Federal Reserve and the federal government are all interrelated, and how changes in the financial system can affect individuals, businesses, and governments on a world-wide basis are covered.

The required textbook for this course is Money and Banking.

IMPORTANT:  Be sure to order the required book for this course.  We recommend that you FIRST select and add your course session to the shopping cart, then select your preferred format of book from the “Recommended Training” options that appear alongside the shopping cart.

Audience: Bank personnel who have not had a formal course in money and banking and who wish to increase their understanding of the banking industry; officer trainees through the mid-management level.

Price: $430

A fundamental study of how money functions in the U.S. and world economies. How money supply, the banking system, the Federal Reserve and the federal government are all interrelated, and how changes in the financial system can affect individuals, businesses, and governments on a world-wide basis are covered.

The required textbook for this course is Money and Banking.

IMPORTANT:  Be sure to order the required book for this course.  We recommend that you FIRST select and add your course session to the shopping cart, then select your preferred format of book from the “Recommended Training” options that appear alongside the shopping cart.

Audience: Bank personnel who have not had a formal course in money and banking and who wish to increase their understanding of the banking industry; officer trainees through the mid-management level.

Price: $430

The Banking Industry is an essential introduction to the business of banking. The course covers the evolution of banking since the 2008 financial crisis, the role of banks in the U.S. economy and the environment in which banks operate and compete. It provides a look into various banking career tracks to inspire and prepare and motivate new bankers and covers innovations in financial products.

Audience: Anyone who needs an introduction to banking, whether just starting a career or a more experienced professional from a different industry.

Price: $215

Rising input costs, strong commodity prices, and inflation are major topics that the Ag industry is currently dealing with. Will your customers be able to handle a sudden change in demand and/or crash of commodity prices. Understanding the underlying credit risk in your ag portfolio will be key moving forward. In this 60 minute session, we will take a quick look at what is currently going on with economic conditions that is impacting credit risk to ag lenders. We will also discuss what are some of the most common ratios, techniques on how to improve net margins, and methods you can implement to stress test your ag loan portfolio.

Key takeaways from this program are:

  • Understanding the current economic conditions that are driving the credit risk in your ag portfolio
  • Reviewing common ratios and financial information used to assign credit risk to your ag portfolio
  • Pricing and product offerings that can improve net margins
  • Techniques that can be used to stress test your current ag portfolio to assess the potential losses that may exist

Target Audience: Ag lenders, commercial lenders, credit analysts.

Presenter
Rob Newberry, Abrigo

Registration Option
Live presentation $275

Recording available through May 23, 2022

Don’t miss this unique Midwest and national economic forecast for 2022!

Presented by the Wisconsin Bankers Association, in partnership with the Illinois Bankers Association, Michigan Bankers Association, Minnesota Bankers Association, Montana Bankers Association, and South Dakota Bankers Association

Tuesday, January 4, 2022 – 10:30 a.m. – Noon CT (11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m. ET or 9:30–11:00 a.m. MT)

Prepare for 2022 by joining an economic outlook with Minneapolis Fed President Neel Kashkari during this virtual event. Then listen to Dr. David Kohl, Economist and Professor Emeritus with Virginia Tech, as he dives into the economic mega trends he expects in 2022 and beyond.

Bankers are encouraged to invite their best clients to virtually share these economic insights. Individual and group registration rates are available.

Virtual Forum Agenda

10:30 – 11:15 a.m. CT

An Economic Outlook with Federal Reserve Bank President Neel Kashkari

Time will be allotted for open Q & A.

11:15 a.m.–Noon CT

Economic Mega Trends 2022 and Beyond with Dr. David Kohl

The pandemic and geopolitical risk has accelerated change in economics and businesses in the U.S. and globally. Bankers, financial services representatives, and regulators must be in the position to interpret both domestic and global economic forces and mega trends that will impact the financial health of their institutions and customers. What are the global economic disruptors and power shifts? How will trade, geopolitics, supply chains, climate changes, and weather in extremes impact competitors? How will the stimulus package and Central Bank’s accommodative policy impact strategic positioning? What are some major mega trends on the horizon? What are the lead and lag indicators that need to be on the dashboards of decision makers? Join Dr. Kohl, an economist and small business person who has traveled over 10 million air miles, delivered 9,000 plus speeches, and presented over 350 webinars connect the dots, and provide wisdom for those walking in the ever-changing economic and business space.

Who Should Attend?

Bank leaders with an interest in the economic and business environment will find value in hearing from our nationally-recognized speakers. Bankers are encouraged to invite their business customers to attend as a part of the bank’s group of attendees. Group pricing is available for your bank. Associate Members of the presenting state bankers associations are also invited to register to attend.

Registration Information

Registration is available individually or as a group. Take advantage of our group pricing to invite additional staff and business customers to join your bank in attending!

  • Individual Registration – $39/connection
  • Group Registration – up to 10 virtual connections – $149/group

Limited sponsorship opportunities are available for this multi-state event. Contact WBA’s Lori Kalscheuer via email for more information.

Media Inquiries: For a Media Registration for the event, please contact WBA’s Cassandra Krause at 608-441-1216 or ckrause@wisbank.com. Advance registration is required.