Posts

According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), millions of elderly citizens are targeted annually with some form of financial fraud, and many of these attempts are successful. It has been estimated that seniors lose approximately $3 billion per year as a result of these scams, which are becoming more widespread and sophisticated. Surprisingly, much of the criminal activity is initiated by a friend or family member. A recent study by the University of Southern California revealed that 55% of respondents reporting any type of elder abuse categorized those acts as financial, and that family members were the most alleged perpetrators of elder financial abuse.

With these facts in mind, banks should maintain heightened sensitivity around transactions that involve elderly clients, particularly if these clients have historically managed their own finances and may be exhibiting signs of cognitive decline. Increased vigilance, in general, can assist in uncovering fraud.

Knowing the customer, coupled with a comprehensive employee training program, can act as a strong front-line tactic to help banks prevent and expose elder financial abuse.

Here are some best practices for recognizing “at-risk” clients:

  • Be on the lookout for non-family members being added to banking or investment accounts.
  • Monitor large money transfers and changes in spending patterns, as these could be signs that some form of abuse is occurring. A senior’s spending habits are often predictable in frequency, volume and payees.
  • Be alert for large amounts of funds exiting accounts to payees who had not been previously paid in any manner.
  • Keep detailed notes in the form of dated, journal-type entries, recording any spending or personal behavior that seems unusual. These notes would be in addition to those kept on risk tolerance, goals, objectives, etc.
  • Follow up with clients via phone or email to discuss any sudden financial decisions that seem out of character.
  • In addition to making personal contact, encourage the client to engage an independent attorney to assist in their financial matters.
  • Understand the laws that apply to the financial abuse of an elder client. Follow prescribed protocols if any illegal activity is suspected.
  • Implement internal procedures to elevate circumstances which may present the need for further inquiry and analysis to the appropriate decision-makers.

“It’s important not just to have a system in place to detect elder financial abuse, but to also act on situations where potential fraud or malicious intent has been identified,” said Kristin Roger, vice president and head of financial institutions at Travelers. “We know banks want to serve as trusted advisors to their customers, and by taking simple steps, they can better protect their customers from potential financial harm.”

Elder financial fraud is on the rise and counts as one of the more heinous abuses of trust that senior citizens might endure. Along with the financial damage inflicted on customers, incidents of elder financial fraud can cause serious reputational harm. Therefore, implementing a sound method of prevention, detection, identification and reporting of this criminal behavior is paramount.

Travelers is committed to managing and mitigating risks and exposures, and does so backed by financial stability and a dedicated team — from underwriters to claim professionals – whose mission is to insure and protect a company’s assets. For more information, visit travelers.com.

Travelers is a WBA Associate Member

The rapid growth of synthetic identity fraud

By Hannah Flanders

Like many aspects of our day-to-day lives, the expansion of technology has both enhanced and complicated the ways in which we operate. As more and more of our information lives online, identity theft — once more likely to occur because of a stolen wallet — has also assumed a digital appearance: synthetic identity theft.

What is Synthetic Identity Fraud?

Synthetic identity fraud is defined as the use of a combination of pieces of personally identifiable information (PII) to fabricate a person or entity in order to commit a dishonest act for personal or financial gain.

This form of identity theft has allowed bad actors to combine a stolen Social Security Number (SSN) and other false information — such as a fake name, address, date of birth, or phone number — to create a counterfeit identity to steal funds, escape prosecution, or any other number of criminal and fraudulent activities.

An Alarming Trend

In 2020, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) named synthetic identity theft as the fastest growing financial crime in the United States. Fraud targets are often those who do not typically use credit or are less likely to monitor their credit activity — including children, homeless individuals, and the elderly. These victims may find themselves blindsided as fraudsters create a new identity, apply for credit, and after years of building good credit by making payments for a time, abandon the account without paying anything back to the financial institution.

While this type of fraud is already difficult to detect due to its elusive or “normal” nature, many bad actors go to incredible lengths to appear as such, states Forbes. In addition to establishing good credit by making payments quickly and on time, some create digital profiles or use P.O. boxes for addresses.

Not only has technology and access to the dark web made PII more accessible to fraudsters, in 2011 the Social Security Administration (SSA) began randomizing the nine-digit social security codes rather than assigning them to individuals based on their geographical location and group number. No longer do social security numbers raise red flags when enrolling or opening accounts “out of state.”

As online banking grows in popularity, so too do concerns for synthetic identity theft. Between prevalent phishing schemes and heightened risks for data breaches — accessing PII and conducting synthetic identity fraud has become much easier than in years prior.

How to be Proactive Against Bad Actors

Inconsistent categorization and reporting make it difficult to identify and mitigate this type of fraud — as far as banks and credit bureaus can tell, these individuals are just like anyone else. . . until they “bust out” or abandon the maxed-out account with no intention of repayment.

After abandoning the false identity’s account, a fragmented file is created. This additional file not only becomes associated with the original SSN but also holds the additional credit report information and other fabricated PII. Unfortunately, this information could negatively impact the credit rating of the real individual.

When working with customers, bankers should advise frequent credit report checks or freezing unused credit at credit bureaus throughout the U.S. as to deter criminals or catch them early.

In addition, customers may take additional steps to protect themselves and their family against synthetic identity theft. One way parents can protect their children from fraudsters is by requesting their child be added to their credit profile. By adding a child to an adult’s credit profile, not only does the child’s own credit profile become established in his or her name and SSN, but the child is also able to begin building their credit.

The Cost of Synthetic Fraud

While victims of identity theft typically are not liable for fraudulent purchases or accounts, as long as they can prove they are the real SSN holder and not the thief, banks and other financial institutions are left to absorb the cost. This scheme is not only incredibly costly to banks across the country — with losses estimated at $20 billion in 2020, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston — but gaps in the U.S. Fair Credit Reporting Act may have also increased the likelihood of repeat offenders.

The Federal Reserve has reported that bad actors are able to ‘flood the financial institution with an overwhelming number of claims’ on their fake accounts, and when creditors are unable to fulfill the investigation in the allotted timeframes, the disputed item is removed from the false credit report and time and time again, fraudsters get away with the act.

“Synthetic IDs are a struggle for community banks to identify,” states Lenore Breit, vice president – compliance manager at Wausau’s Prevail Bank. “Based on a recent presentation, [community banks] most likely have synthetic ID fraud in their deposit and loan accounts that remains undetected with traditional third-party ID verification programs that most community banks use.”

“There are other, more robust ID verification programs available to detect synthetic ID fraud,” adds Breit. “But they are costly and may not interface with legacy software.”

One such software program, the electronic Consent Based SSN Verification service, was created in part by the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief, and Consumer Protection Act. The electronic service offered by the SSA was created in 2018 to aid financial institutions in combating synthetic identity fraud and verify an authorizing individual’s name, date of birth, and SSN against the SSA records. Services are based on the annual transaction volume and can cost thousands or even millions of dollars.

Common Signs of Synthetic Identification Theft

While difficult to trace, there are a few significant ways bankers can remain attentive to PII and other key indicators of synthetic identity fraud.

Most obvious is ensuring all SSNs match to the PII given. Do not assume a name change or relocation; ask questions or require verification for the sake of your bank and the security and privacy of all customers. This extra step could make all the difference in protecting the personal information of every customer.

If an account is already open, bankers should note applicants who have the same contact information or SSN as well as those with multiple authorized users.

As synthetic identity fraud becomes increasingly prevalent throughout the U.S., it is critical, for the safety of customers and security of all financial institutions, that Wisconsin bankers are prepared to combat this emerging fraudulent activity, caution community members against sharing unnecessary personal information with others, and assist individuals in regaining their rightful identity if necessary.

If you are interested in learning more about synthetic identity fraud, how these schemes can impact your bank or customers, or more ways you can take a stand against bad actors, please contact WBA’s Legal Team at wbalegal@wisbank.com or 608-441-1200.

By Detective Daniel R. Kuhnz, Beaver Dam Police Department

All around Wisconsin and the country, financial institutions have been targeted by check fraudsters who use homeless or indigent people to cash counterfeit checks. This method of operation has been dubbed “operation homeless” around the country. Essentially what happens is bad guys get a hold of valid business checks by intercepting them from unsecured mailboxes of businesses. Other methods of obtaining banking information of a victim business might be by purchasing blocks of data from sellers on the dark web. The bad guy then provides the account identifying information from the check or the check itself to a person who actually manufactures a new check with the valid account number and routing number on it but alters the dollar amount to stay under a certain limit (common amounts are $2,500 or less), alters the payee, and alters the check number.

They then proceed to recruit vulnerable people who are promised a portion of the proceeds. They will travel substantial distances to financial institutions that the checks are written from, so the account numbers can be validated and adequate funds are determined to be in the account to cover the check amount. They are told to use their real identification when cashing the checks to legitimize the transaction.

The bad guys who are driving the homeless or indigent people around will usually wait in an adjacent parking lot and monitor the building. If the teller determines the transaction to be suspicious and calls the police, the homeless or indigent individual is abandoned at the bank. In most cases, the homeless or indigent person is arrested and put in jail. However, law enforcement and prosecutors are usually more interested in “moving up the chain” to identify the intermediate individuals that were driving the homeless or indigent person around and ultimately, who manufactured the counterfeit check. This can be very difficult as the intermediate suspects usually provide false names and change their phone numbers.

This crime, contrary to popular belief, does not only occur only in the big cities. In fact, many of the cases that were recently found to be connected around Wisconsin overwhelmingly occurred in suburban and rural communities.

Law enforcement around the state would benefit from tellers and other employees at banking institutions to always be vigilant and constantly question whether something makes sense or not. We are confident that banking institutions are always on the lookout for fraudulent activity such as internet scams but this type of fraud can be more difficult to detect and act on. We simply want to remind you that you are on the front lines of this type of criminal activity and should know about current trends and fraud schemes that are occurring.

Triangle Background

Dave Oldenburg

By Dave Oldenburg, fraud officer, Bank First, Watertown and member of the WBA Financial Crimes Committee

Business check cashing fraud, dubbed “operation homeless” by law enforcement, continues to impact our industry. Furthermore, it can negatively affect customer perception when fraudulent “on-us” checks are cashed at your bank.

Although there are many kinds of check fraud schemes, business check cashing fraud begins when a customer’s legitimate business checks are taken from commercial mailboxes. Often times, the compromise occurs when a customer’s outgoing mail or the recipient’s mailbox is breached. These mailboxes are often unsecured — making them an ideal target to steal checks. Once the checks are stolen, the ringleader produces quality counterfeit checks that closely resemble the features of legitimate checks. In this type of fraud, the intent is to cash as many checks as possible at numerous bank branches — sometimes pocketing tens of thousands in just one day.

The ringleader creates the checks, but recruits individuals (mules) to cash the checks if they have current and valid identification. In turn, the mules receive a small portion each time a check is paid out. In an organized fashion, these criminals travel around the state with counterfeit items, drawn on many accounts from different banks.

Fortunately, there are ways to stop fraud in its tracks. Here are some suggested “best practices” for front-line staff:

  • Compare the check to recently cleared checks as well as the signature card on file.
  • Looks for signs of traced, forged, or scanned signatures that appear irregular.
  • The current check range on recently cleared items may be considered — however a counterfeit check is often in the current range.
  • Look for recently issued identification (sometimes mules will obtain identification for the sole purpose of committing check fraud).
  • Refuse to cash the check when presented with worn or damaged identification that omits information.
  • Refuse identification that doesn’t appear to match the individual presenting the check.

Be aware of some common “red flags” that may be indicators of business check cashing fraud such as:

  • The branch location is “out of the way” from the non-customer’s address listed on the check or listed on the identification presented.
  • The person presenting the check came to the branch on foot or was dropped off.
  • The person presenting the check appears anxious, rushed, or overly chatty or name drops.
  • The person is in contact with someone on their mobile phone while the transaction is being performed.

To help mitigate your institution’s risk of loss, it is recommended that checks presented by non-customers be handled with additional scrutiny. Most importantly, if the maker of the check does not have positive pay services, consider adopting procedures where an authorized signer is contacted to validate checks over a certain dollar amount.

The Wisconsin Department of Revenue recently mailed identity verification (PIN) and grant denial letters to individuals and businesses related to the Wisconsin Tomorrow Small Business Recovery Grant. Many who received these letters did not apply for the grant, making it likely those applications were submitted fraudulently by ID thieves.

For reference, attached are examples of the letters DOR has sent:

Grant PIN Verification Letter
Grant Denial Letter
Grant Denial Letter Page 2

We understand citizens receiving these letters are contacting local law enforcement agencies to report identity theft. Please refer to the Wisconsin Tomorrow Small Business Recovery Grant link for additional information related to the grant program and resources available for victims of ID theft.

The citizen, or their authorized representative, may make a request for a copy of the fraudulent grant application by contacting DOR customer service at (608) 266-2772.

If you have any questions, do not hesitate to reach us at (608) 266-2772. We appreciate your assistance with this important issue.

By, Ally Bates

Consumer fraud has been on the rise amid the COVID-19 pandemic. WBA has become increasingly aware of unemployment, EIDL, and PPP fraud. On July 7, 2020, the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) issued an advisory to alert financial institutions to potential indicators of imposter scams and money mule schemes. 

The advisory contains descriptions of imposter scams and money mule schemes, financial red flag indicators, and information on reporting suspicious activity. Generally, fraudsters are targeting customers, and financial institutions are advised to remain alert for potential suspicious activities. For example, a customer may be in contact with criminals impersonating organizations such as the Internal Revenue Services (IRS), the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the World Health Organization (WHO), and other healthcare or non-profit groups, looking to offer fraudulent services to victims. 

In addition to imposter scams, FinCEN outlines money mule schemes whereby a person, either knowingly or unknowingly, transfers money that has been acquired illegally, on behalf of another. An individual may either be motivated by ignorance, a romance scam, or be complicit, with expectations of profit. For example, a financial institution may notice transactions that do not fit a customer’s history, suspicious new accounts, or otherwise atypical transactions. 

In particular, there have been schemes detected related to unemployment fraud. Financial institutions may notice a customer who receives multiple state unemployment insurance payments. The United States Secret Service has identified a crime ring behind a large volume of fraudulent unemployment claims being filed with State departments across the country. As discussed above, participants may be complicit, or unknowing of their involvement, financial institutions should remain vigilant to identify potential fraud. 

Similar to unemployment fraud, financial institutions have begun identifying fraud related to EIDL and PPP loans. Given the potential avenues for fraud, financial institutions should become familiar with the known schemes, and resources available. For additional information consider the following resources: 
 
FinCEN advisory. 

Fraud related to SBA loan programs. 

By, Ally Bates

The IRS assembled a list of red flags regarding COVID-19 related programs like the Economic Impact Payments (EIP) and the CARES Act. The current list is available below.

Economic Impact Payments (EIP) based questionable/fraudulent or red flag activities:

Multiple direct deposits of EIP into the same account, particularly when the amounts of the checks are the same or approximately the same (e.g., $1,200 or $2,400)

Deposits of multiple paper checks into the same bank account, particularly when the amounts of the checks are the same or approximately the same (e.g., $1,200 or $2,400)

Cashing of multiple emergency assistance checks by the same individual

Deposits of one or more emergency assistance checks, when the accountholder is a business and the payee/endorser is an individual other than the accountholder

Opening of a new account with an emergency assistance check, where the name of the potential accountholder is different from that of the depositor of the check

Individual accounts opened within the last 60 days receiving multiple US Treasury checks or direct deposits from the US Treasury

Rapid transfers of funds that consolidate deposits -or- large subsequent counter withdrawals in cash -or- serial ATM withdrawals for the maximum allowable amount -or- large amounts of funds withdrawn in the form of cash back at retail establishments using prepaid debit cards from individual accounts receiving COVID-19 assistance

Other tax relief under the CARES Act questionable/fraudulent or red flag activities:

Opening of a new business account to receive a direct deposit of assistance funds or apply for a loan

The business does not appear to have a lengthy history (e.g., established within the last few months), a physical presence or address, or an Employer Identification Number

The business displays some discrepancies with the address, or it is located in a high-risk jurisdiction or an area that is not usually associated with the merchandise they are selling

The business has an unclear business model and it is difficult to determine the true nature of the company and its operations.

The business is receiving payroll protection relief without history of payroll activity

The business receives a payment/credit from Treasury in addition to a loan from SBA – businesses can be eligible for only one

Deposit to the business is solely from CARES act assistance

Additional red flags to look out for:

Customers could be victims of account takeover after their identity is stolen

Customer provides a document that appears to be a check from the U.S. Treasury, often in an amount less than the expected EIP, with instructions to contact the fraudulent government agency, via a phone number or online, to verify personal information in order to receive the entire benefit

The customer’s personal bank account starts to receive transactions that do not fit his or her history of typical transactions, including overseas transactions, When asked about the changes in transactions, the customer declines requests for “know your customer” documents or inquiries regarding sources of funds, and may mention COVID-19, relief work, or a “work-from-home” opportunity

The customer purchases large amounts of convertible virtual currency (CVC) or engages in fiat currency transactions

The customer opens accounts in his or her name at multiple banks so he or she may receive money from various individuals/businesses and then move the money to other accounts, as specified by the customer’s fraudulent “employer”

By, Eric Skrum

Events

Snap up this expert training for new security officers. Everyone has to start somewhere — even security officers. They are foundational to the safety of each financial institution and training is essential to their success. This practical program will address the security officer’s role, best practices, regulatory compliance, physical security issues, and more.

After This Webinar You’ll Be Able To:

  • Comprehend exactly what the security officer is responsible for under the Bank Protection Act and implementing regulations
  • Understand lighting, landscaping, locations, and locks – the four Ls of security
  • Determine the proper steps to take with cash recyclers and ITMs
  • Explain to management the need for an annual risk assessment
  • Identify the records the bank security officer should keep

Webinar Details
The Bank Protection Act (BPA) and implementing regulations specify security officer requirements. This program will focus on these regulations, especially on Regulation H, to demonstrate what your security program should contain. Although the regulations are very specific, they allow leeway for risk-management decision-making. This program will include industry standard practices and demonstrate (with pictures) how to comply. Security officer dos, don’ts, and best practices will be covered. Other topics will include:

  • How often your staff should be trained on security
  • How new equipment will change your training strategies
  • How often the security officer should receive specialized training, like active shooter
  • What the security officer should consider when evaluating equipment or training issues

Who Should Attend?
This informative session is designed for security officers, risk management professionals, internal auditors, and compliance officers.

Take-Away Toolkit

  • Regulation H checklist to determine if your security program is current
  • Night inspection form to help implement your physical security inspections
  • Proper Employee Conduct During and After a Robbery form for training
  • Risk Management Basics: Before, During, and After the Robbery
  • Risk Management Basics: Robbery Styles
  • Risk Management Basics: Physical Risk Assessments, Thinking Like the Robber
  • Sample incident report
  • Employee training log
  • Interactive quiz
  • PDF of slides and speaker’s contact info for follow-up questions
  • Attendance certificate provided to self-report CE credits

NOTE: All materials are subject to copyright. Transmission, retransmission, or republishing of any webinar to other institutions or those not employed by your agency is prohibited. Print materials may be copied for eligible participants only.

Presenter
Barry Thompson, CRCM – Thompson Consulting Group, LLC
Barry Thompson
is an international speaker, trainer, consultant, and writer. He is a security and compliance “guru” for a leading national training organization and regularly presents security conferences for trade groups – he has trained over 54,000 financial professionals.

Thompson is recognized worldwide, presenting in Brussels, Belgium to European bankers on internal fraud; at the United Nations on identity theft; and to Japanese bankers on bank security. Thompson has worked in the financial services industry for over four decades, and has held the positions of security officer, compliance officer, treasurer, senior vice president, and executive vice president. He has handled over 900 security cases and has been involved with investigations and prosecutions at the federal, state, and local levels. Thompson is the author of 101 Security Tips for the Beginning Security Officer and Inside the Vault and has been interviewed by Newsweek, Computer World, USA Today, and other national publications.

Registration Options

  • $245 – Live Webinar Access
  • $245 – OnDemand Access + Digital Download
  • $350 – Both Live & On-Demand Access + Digital Download

Garner CTR acumen and expertise with this line-by-line look at the form.

Do you understand aggregation and know when to use “unknown”? Learn more about FinCEN’s requirements and guidance. This detailed review will bring you newfound insight, increase reporting accuracy, and ensure compliance.

After This Webinar You’ll Be Able To:

  • Understand the difference between aggregate and multiple transactions
  • Know the two options for reporting transactions of a sole proprietorship
  • Explain when separate transactions should be aggregated
  • Distinguish between when “unknown” should and should not be used
  • Report multiple cash-in and cash-out transactions on a single CTR

Webinar Details
Whether you are new to CTRs or have some experience, little nuances and off-pattern scenarios can cause confusion. This webinar will guide you through the report process by explaining each section, incorporating FinCEN’s own instructions, FAQs, and guidance. Accurately completing the CTR not only provides vital information for law enforcement, but also keeps your institution out of trouble with the regulators. Join us to gain valuable insights into the CTR reporting process.

Who Should Attend?
This informative session is designed for BSA staff, anyone responsible for any aspect of CTR reporting, branch management, compliance personnel, and auditors.

Take-Away Toolkit

  • Sample CTR reporting policy
  • CTR cheat sheet
  • Internet links to helpful resources
  • Employee training log
  • Interactive quiz
  • PDF of slides and speaker’s contact info for follow-up questions
  • Attendance certificate provided to self-report CE credits

NOTE: All materials are subject to copyright. Transmission, retransmission, or republishing of any webinar to other institutions or those not employed by your agency is prohibited. Print materials may be copied for eligible participants only.

Presenter
Mary-Lou Heighes – Compliance Plus, Inc.

Mary-Lou Heighes is president and founder of Compliance Plus, Inc., which has assisted financial institutions with the development of compliance programs since 2000. She provides compliance training for trade associations and financial institutions. Heighes has been an instructor at regulatory compliance schools, conducts dozens of webinars, and speaks at numerous conferences throughout the country.

Involved with financial institutions since 1989, Heighes has over 30 years’ compliance experience. Before starting Compliance Plus in 2000, she spent five years working as a loan officer, marketer, and collector. She also worked at a state trade association for seven years providing compliance assistance and advising on state and federal legislative issues that affect financial institutions.

Registration Options

  • $245 – Live Webinar Access
  • $245 – OnDemand Access + Digital Download
  • $350 – Both Live & On-Demand Access + Digital Download

Learn how to evaluate your institution’s compliance with the AML Act provisions already in place and plan for those coming down the pike. This session will address the impact on policies, risk assessments, monitoring procedures, and training programs, as well as provide tools and examples to successfully navigate the changes.

After This Webinar You’ll Be Able To:

  • Identify the purpose of the AML Act and its impact on your BSA program
  • Incorporate the eight AML/CFT priorities into your BSA/AML risk assessment and red flag monitoring programs
  • Explain FinCEN’s 2022 final rule to implement beneficial ownership information reporting
  • Understand FinCEN’s frameworks to facilitate information sharing among financial institutions and their service providers, regulators, law enforcement, and others
  • Detail how virtual currency is considered in regulatory definitions and red flags you should know
  • Prepare for changes being proposed to CTR and SAR reporting, including to thresholds and required fields
  • Use the information and tools provided to inform your management and board of current and future changes

Webinar Details
It’s been three years since the Anti-Money Laundering Act of 2020 (AML Act) became effective. While there have been a number of notices, advisories, reports, and rulemakings, there are many key components, which may result in additional regulation. Passage of the AML Act has already set in motion a number of issues that will impact your risk-based BSA program and potentially change recordkeeping and reporting requirements. From risk assessments to beneficial ownership to CTRs and SARs — you need to be prepared for changes big and small.

Who Should Attend?
This informative session is designed for BSA officers, compliance officers, security officers, and anyone responsible for managing your BSA/AML program.

Take-Away Toolkit

  • AML Act implementation plan
  • Sample BSA/AML risk assessment updated for the AML Act
  • Beneficial ownership final rule fact sheet
  • Employee training log
  • Interactive quiz
  • PDF of slides and speaker’s contact info for follow-up questions
  • Attendance certificate provided to self-report CE credits

NOTE: All materials are subject to copyright. Transmission, retransmission, or republishing of any webinar to other institutions or those not employed by your agency is prohibited. Print materials may be copied for eligible participants only.

Presenter
Dawn Kincaid – Brode Consulting Services Inc
Dawn Kincaid
began her banking career while attending The Ohio State University. She has over 20 years’ experience in client service, operations, information technology, administrative and board relations, marketing, and compliance. Most recently Kincaid served as the Senior Vice President of Operations for a central-Ohio-based community bank, where she created and refined policies and procedures, conducted self-audits and risk assessments, and organized implementation of new products and services. Kincaid has served in the roles of Compliance, BSA/AML, CRA, Privacy, and Security Officer. She has led training initiatives, prepared due diligence information, completed a variety of regulatory applications, coordinated internal and external audits and exams, and presented for numerous state associations.

Registration Options

  • $245 – Live Webinar Access
  • $245 – OnDemand Access + Digital Download
  • $350 – Both Live & On-Demand Access + Digital Download

BSA officers are essential to your financial institution’s regulatory compliance and risk mitigation. They must be aware of the highest-risk areas, including cybercrime, money laundering, human trafficking, marijuana-related businesses, and more. Therefore, it’s critical they receive regular training and status updates. This webinar will provide both!

After This Webinar You’ll Be Able To:

  • Define your institution’s current BSA/AML risks and the impact of pending BSA regulation and changes
  • Apply best practices to identify and monitor high-risk accountholders
  • Review updated chapters to the BSA/AML exam manual
  • Explain the impact the AML Act may have on your current BSA/AML program
  • Understand the highest risk areas facing your institution, including cybercrime, marijuana-related businesses, human trafficking, and cryptocurrency
  • Use the information and tools provided to inform management and directors of current and future changes

Webinar Details
Managing effective dates and timelines that change in an instant, updating policies and procedures to reflect new requirements, pushing information out to staff members, monitoring accountholder transactions for anything suspicious, and staying informed of the next change, advisory, or piece of guidance are just some of a BSA/AML officer’s many duties. Each day these officers work to manage and implement the many facets of BSA/AML regulation, review guidance, and scan through mountains of monitoring reports — all to protect your financial institution from violations. But since they often wear many hats, it’s easy for a monthly review or that annual report to slip through the cracks.

This session will review recent citations and issues real life BSA officers are experiencing so you can focus your time and efforts. It will also address the importance of communication between the BSA officer and the board in establishing a culture of compliance that meets examiners’ expectations for directors.

Who Should Attend?
This informative session is designed for BSA/AML officers, compliance officers, and senior management.

Take-Away Toolkit

  • BSA policy checklist
  • Sample BSA/AML quarterly board report
  • Sample BSA/AML risk assessment
  • Beneficial ownership final rule fact sheet
  • Employee training log
  • Interactive quiz
  • PDF of slides and speaker’s contact info for follow-up questions
  • Attendance certificate provided to self-report CE credits

NOTE: All materials are subject to copyright. Transmission, retransmission, or republishing of any webinar to other institutions or those not employed by your agency is prohibited. Print materials may be copied for eligible participants only.

Presenter
Dawn Kincaid – Brode Consulting Services Inc
Dawn Kincaid
began her banking career while attending The Ohio State University.  She has over 20 years’ experience in client service, operations, information technology, administrative and board relations, marketing, and compliance.  Most recently Kincaid served as the Senior Vice President of Operations for a central-Ohio-based community bank, where she created and refined policies and procedures, conducted self-audits and risk assessments, and organized implementation of new products and services. Kincaid has served in the roles of Compliance, BSA/AML, CRA, Privacy, and Security Officer.  She has led training initiatives, prepared due diligence information, completed a variety of regulatory applications, coordinated internal and external audits and exams, and presented for numerous state associations.

Registration Options

  • $245 – Live Webinar Access
  • $245 – OnDemand Access + Digital Download
  • $350 – Both Live & On-Demand Access + Digital Download

FedNow is nearly here! This new payment channel will require proper planning and risk assessment. Join us to learn and prepare for working with the FedNow service while also managing risk and product compliance.

After This Webinar You’ll Be Able To:

  • Identify whether an audit or risk assessment is required for the FedNow service and how to comply
  • Describe the potential fraud associated with faster payments
  • Understand the unique risks of faster payments
  • Take advantage of the fraud controls offered by the Federal Reserve for the FedNow service
  • Establish a foundational understanding of the FedNow rules and regulations

Webinar Details

As we approach the release of the FedNow service in 2023 — the first new payment channel from the Federal Reserve in 40 years — it is important to properly prepare. FedNow instant payments will be different from payment channels of the past. It is critical for financial institutions to understand the risks, controls, rules, and regulations surrounding this new service. Join the Payments Professor, Kevin Olsen, to learn about the risks and fraud that could be involved with FedNow, now!

Who Should Attend?
This session is best suited for directors, managers, compliance officers, and operations personnel.

Take-Away Toolkit

  • Links to FedNow service resources for fraud controls and the FedLine Security & Resiliency Assurance Program
  • Employee training log
  • Interactive quiz
  • PDF of slides and speaker’s contact info for follow-up questions
  • Attendance certificate provided to self-report CE credits

NOTE: All materials are subject to copyright. Transmission, retransmission, or republishing of any webinar to other institutions or those not employed by your agency is prohibited. Print materials may be copied for eligible participants only.

Presenter

Kevin Olsen, AAP, NCP, APRP, CHPC – VSoft Corporation
For most of the past two decades Kevin Olsen has been managing the development and delivery of education services, including in-person, web conferences, and webcasts. Olsen creates programs, presentations, and articles designed to orient and educate financial professionals on electronic payment topics. As the “Payments Professor,” he brings enthusiasm and motivation to presentations. He views the world as a classroom, which is exemplified in the “edutainment” ed-u-tain-mint (noun: when education is motivating, informative, and fun) style of training he uses to educate and inform all on the latest developments and trends in the fascinating world of electronic payments

Registration Options

  • $245 – Live Webinar Access
  • $245 – OnDemand Access + Digital Download
  • $350 – Both Live & On-Demand Access + Digital Download

Determining liability is more than finger pointing. Being able to distinguish liability for numerous types of transactions is crucial to making an accountholder whole, detecting fraud, reducing your institution’s risk, etc. Attend this webinar and learn how your institution fits into the mix when liability is in question.

After This Webinar You’ll Be Able To:

  • Distinguish which party is liable in each type of account fraud situation
  • Determine when your institution must reimburse the accountholder
  • Explain what your institution can and can’t require of accountholders when investigating fraud
  • Understand your institution’s liability for forgeries
  • Distinguish between the liabilities of the ODFI and the RDFI for ACH fraud
  • Explain what constitutes an unauthorized electronic withdrawal

Webinar Details

Account fraud has caused staggering losses to financial institutions and losses continue to rise. Your institution’s liability for forged checks, ACH fraud, remotely created and deposited items, and unauthorized electronic items varies depending on the type of fraud, how it occurred, and whether it was a consumer or commercial account. The multitude of applicable laws is mindboggling! This webinar will explain which law applies in each type of account fraud situation, explain your institution’s liability, and what can be done to reduce risk.

Who Should Attend?
This informative session will benefit deposit operations personnel and managers, tellers, compliance staff, new accounts personnel, security officers, fraud investigators, attorneys, and auditors.

Take-Away Toolkit

  • Chart listing the law in each type of account fraud situation and which party is liable
  • Employee training log
  • Interactive quiz
  • PDF of slides and speaker’s contact info for follow-up questions
  • Attendance certificate provided to self-report CE credits

NOTE: All materials are subject to copyright. Transmission, retransmission, or republishing of any webinar to other institutions or those not employed by your agency is prohibited. Print materials may be copied for eligible participants only.

Presenter

Elizabeth Fast, JD, CPA – Spencer Fane LLP
Elizabeth Fast is a partner with Spencer Fane Britt & Browne LLP where she specializes in the representation of financial institutions. Fast is the head of the firm’s training division. She received her law degree from the University of Kansas and her undergraduate degree from Pittsburg State University. In addition, she has a Master of Business Administration degree and she is a Certified Public Accountant. Before joining Spencer Fane, she was General Counsel, Senior Vice President, and Corporate Secretary of a $9 billion bank with more than 130 branches, where she managed all legal, regulatory, and compliance functions.

Registration Options

  • $245 – Live Webinar Access
  • $245 – OnDemand Access + Digital Download
  • $350 – Both Live & On-Demand Access + Digital Download

AML/BSA compliance is always near or at the top of any compliance professional’s list of topics to monitor. The Anti-Money Laundering Act of 2020 made several substantial changes to the BSA statute, and it’s now up to FinCEN and the prudential regulators to put them into practice by amending the regulation and exam procedures. Most critical is a change to the beneficial owner rules that took effect in 2018; eventually (key word there) these requirements will be shifted onto businesses to be maintained in a government database. We seen the first few new regulations from FinCEN to put these requirements into effect. How should financial institutions deal with that now though? As well, we’ll see changes in SAR procedures and the inclusion of federal AML priorities into individual institutions’ BSA policies.

There is a lot going on — in this webinar, we’ll cover the new requirements, talk about what’s coming and when, and provide recommendations on how to deal with critical BSA/AML issues right now.

What You’ll Learn

  • The AML Act of 2020 — what’s in it, what it means, including changes to the Beneficial Owner rules
  • New regulations from FinCEN
  • Additional coming regulatory changes
  • Current examiner expectations
  • Hot spots and developing areas of concern
  • Enforcement trends and actions – what we can learn
  • AML threats in digital activities and cyber
  • Cannabis banking and AML expectations
  • Weaknesses in CDD programs

Who Should Attend
The program is designed for BSA Officers, Compliance Officers, Auditors, and those responsible for either overseeing BSA in general or those within the lending business units with BSA responsibilities.

Instructor Bio
Carl Pry is a Certified Regulatory Compliance Manager (CRCM) and Certified Risk Professional (CRP) who is a Managing Director for Treliant Risk Advisors in Washington, D.C. Through his working career, as well as through his experience as a banking attorney and officer, he has provided a variety of regulatory compliance and financial performance services to financial institutions and other clients throughout the country. He has written extensively regarding consumer and commercial compliance, tax, audit, and financial institution legal issues, and is a frequent contributor to and currently serves on the Editorial Advisory Board for the ABA Bank Compliance magazine. He has spoken at scores of banking, compliance, and state bar associations, and has conducted training sessions for financial institutions across the country.

Registration Options

Live Access, 30 Days OnDemand Playback, Presenter Materials and Handouts $279

  • Available Upgrades:
    • 12 Months OnDemand Playback + $110
    • 12 Months OnDemand Playback + CD + $140
    • Additional Live Access + $75 per person

Elder fraud — just the thought is distressing! Isolation during the COVID-19 pandemic worsened the problem, leading to an increase in elder scams and theft. It’s so important to be able to identify it, react appropriately, and provide help to your accountholders when possible. Learn how!

Webinar Highlights:

  • Identify the warning signs of a senior person in trouble
  • Understand unusual transactions a senior citizen may conduct and why
  • Know who is most likely to take advantage of a senior citizen
  • Determine the organizations you can turn to for help
  • Train staff how to separate a problem party from the senior citizen
  • React appropriately when a senior citizen threatens a staff member

Webinar Details
One of the toughest problems for a financial institution is when a call arrives, or a person walks in, with a potential elder fraud issue. If a family member is a victim, the question may become, “why didn’t you do anything to protect my mother?” If it is the victim themselves, their tears will tear you apart when they relay the story of the romance scam, lottery scam, or caretaker who took advantage of them. Criminals know who they want to target and have found ways to get close to their victims. They know exactly how to manipulate targets and don’t care what happens to them after the scam. Many victims will not admit it or are unwilling to prosecute the criminals because they don’t want anyone to know they were deceived. This webinar will review how the attacks work and how to get the victims help if possible.

Who Should Attend?
This informative session is directed to frontline staff, tellers, risk managers, loan origination staff, security officers, and management personnel who handle senior financial exploitation.

Take-Away Toolkit

  • List of organizations that can help with elder financial exploitation
  • Incident report form
  • Security tips
  • Employee training log
  • Interactive quiz
  • PDF of slides and speaker’s contact info for follow-up questions
  • Attendance certificate provided to self-report CE credits

NOTE: All materials are subject to copyright. Transmission, retransmission, or republishing of any webinar to other institutions or those not employed by your agency is prohibited. Print materials may be copied for eligible participants only.

Presenter

Barry Thompson. CRCM – Thompson Consulting Group, LLC

Barry Thompson is an international speaker, trainer, consultant, and writer. He is a security and compliance “guru” for a leading national training organization and regularly presents security conferences for trade groups — he has trained over 54,000 financial professionals.

Thompson is recognized worldwide, presenting in Brussels, Belgium to European bankers on internal fraud; at the United Nations on identity theft; and to Japanese bankers on bank security. Thompson has worked in the financial services industry for over four decades, and has held the positions of security officer, compliance officer, treasurer, senior vice president, and executive vice president. He has handled over 900 security cases and has been involved with investigations and prosecutions at the federal, state, and local levels. Thompson is the author of 101 Security Tips for the Beginning Security Officer and Inside the Vault and has been interviewed by Newsweek, Computer World, USA Today, and other national publications.

Registration Options

  • $245 – Live Webinar Access
  • $245 – OnDemand Access + Digital Download
  • $350 – Both Live & On-Demand Access + Digital Download

Can you name five important reasons BSA training must be provided for lenders? Can your program identify loan fraud? When are SARs required? This webinar will address those issues and more, plus provide the required BSA training lenders need.

After This Webinar You’ll Be Able To:

  • Identify red flags for money laundering and lending risk factors
  • Use sample questions for due diligence during the loan application process
  • Understand the importance of BSA due diligence throughout the life of the loan, not just at application
  • Explain the beneficial ownership requirements to legal entities applying for loans
  • Distinguish between normal loan applicant activity and suspicious activity

Webinar Details

BSA examiners are digging deeper and asking more questions about the lending function. Could an examiner find loan fraud that was missed by your due diligence process? Does your institution have a system for identifying false statements and identity theft attempts on loan applications? Do your lenders know such activities may require filing a suspicious activity report? Is your process for documenting beneficial ownership effective? Now is the time to ensure your lenders’ BSA training is up to par.

Who Should Attend?

This informative session is designed for loan officers, loan operations, BSA officers, BSA staff, branch personnel, risk managers, compliance officers, and auditors.

Take-Away Toolkit

  • Customer due diligence checklists under the beneficial ownership rules
  • Template to develop and update a risk profile
  • Procedures template for identifying and verifying beneficial owners
  • Employee training log
  • Interactive quiz
  • PDF of slides and speaker’s contact info for follow-up questions
  • Attendance certificate provided to self-report CE credits

NOTE: All materials are subject to copyright. Transmission, retransmission, or republishing of any webinar to other institutions or those not employed by your agency is prohibited. Print materials may be copied for eligible participants only.

Presenter

Susan Costonis, CRCM, Compliance Training & Consulting for Financial Institutions
Susan Costonis is a compliance consultant and trainer who began her career in 1978. She specializes in compliance management along with deposit and lending regulatory training. Costonis has successfully managed compliance programs and exams for institutions that ranged from a community bank to large multi-state bank holding companies. She has been a compliance officer for institutions supervised by the OCC, FDIC, and Federal Reserve. Costonis has been a Certified Regulatory Compliance Manager since 1998, completed the ABA Graduate Compliance School, and graduated from the University of Akron and the Graduate Banking School of the University of Colorado. She regularly presents to financial institution audiences in several states and “translates” complex regulations into simple concepts by using humor and real-life examples.

Registration Options

  • $245 – Live Webinar Access
  • $245 – OnDemand Access + Digital Download
  • $350 – Both Live & On-Demand Access + Digital Download

Why do robbers choose one location over another? How can robbers be deterred? What life-saving steps should employees take when facing a robbery? All financial institution employees must recognize the risk that exists, and understand that knowledge and quality training are vital to survival.

After This Webinar You’ll Be Able To:

  • Use situational awareness to become safer
  • Recognize vulnerabilities within your habits and environment
  • Distinguish different robbery methods
  • Realize the importance of safe opening procedures
  • Know what steps to take during a robbery
  • Understand which actions to avoid during a robbery
  • Identify habits that endanger
  • Reduce risk

Webinar Details
There have been many changes in our country over the last couple of years. In what seems to be an increasingly violent world, how can we protect ourselves? Despite robbery being one of the most feared crimes for the banking industry, training is often lacking and uninspired. This session will go beyond basic robbery training to focus on prevention and recognizing weaknesses that can cause vulnerability. It will reveal the facts about robbery, address current trends, and provide step-by-step guidelines for effective prevention, safe response, and managing the aftereffects.

Every employee can play a role in prevention, and it is critical that all personnel are prepared and trained in the safest response methods. Attendees will learn various methods used by crooks, how their observations of the event can be valuable, and essential actions to take following a robbery.

Who Should Attend?
This must-attend webinar will benefit all financial institution employees.

Take-Away Toolkit

  • Robber description form
  • Robbery quiz
  • Before, during, and after a robbery checklist
  • Robbery basics and beyond handout material
  • Employee training log
  • Interactive quiz
  • PDF of slides and speaker’s contact info for follow-up questions
  • Attendance certificate provided to self-report CE credits

NOTE: All materials are subject to copyright. Transmission, retransmission, or republishing of any webinar to other institutions or those not employed by your institution is prohibited. Print materials may be copied for eligible participants only.

Presenter
Carol Dodgen – Dodgen Security Consulting, LLC

Carol Dodgen is the owner of Dodgen Security Consulting, LLC. Since 1998, her company has provided services including training, ATM lighting inspections, and security assessments to financial institutions, government entities, and businesses. Previously, Dodgen served as the security training officer for Compass Bank. She earned a Master’s in Criminal Justice and spent several years as an adjunct criminal justice instructor.

Dodgen is a nationally recognized speaker who has provided training for over 150,000 corporate, manufacturing, utility, law enforcement, and security personnel over the past 26 years. She holds a Crime Prevention Designation and provides instruction on crime prevention, workplace violence, and robbery. In 2009, Dodgen was appointed by the governor to the Alabama Security Regulatory Board and served for six years as vice chair.

Registration Options

  • $245 – Live Webinar Access
  • $245 – OnDemand Access + Digital Download
  • $350 – Both Live & On-Demand Access + Digital Download